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Shelsley Walsh Speed Hill Climb

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Shelsley Walsh Speed Hill Climb
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Wikipedia: Shelsley Walsh Speed Hill Climb

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A hill climb first held in 1905, currently organized by the Midland Automobile Club, and held in Shelsley Walsh, Worcestershire, England.

History

The following section is an excerpt from Wikipedia's Shelsley Walsh Speed Hill Climb page on 4 April 2018, text available via the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Shelsley Walsh Speed Hill Climb is a hillclimb in Shelsley Walsh, Worcestershire, England, organised by the Midland Automobile Club (MAC). It is one of the oldest motorsport events in the world, and is in fact the oldest to have been staged continuously (wartime excepted) on its original course, first having been run in 1905. On that first occasion, the course was 992 yards (907 m) in length, but in 1907 it was standardised at 1000 yards (914 m), the length it remains today.

Shelsley Walsh is a notably steep course by the standards of today's hillclimbs. It rises 328 feet (100 m) during its length, for an average gradient of 1 in 9.14 (10.9%), with the steepest section being as much as 1 in 6.24 (16%). This makes Shelsley a hill on which power is important, and on which the gap in times between the most powerful cars and the rest is greater than at many other venues. It is also narrow, being no more than 12 feet (3.66 m) wide at some points.

The winner of the first event, held on Saturday 12 August 1905, was Ernest Instone (35 hp Daimler), who established the hill record by recording a time of 77.6 seconds for an average speed of 26.15 mph (42.08 km/h). However, at that time hillclimbs were not strictly speed events at all, performances being rated in terms of a formula based on power and cars of 20 hp or more being required to be four-seaters and to carry passengers. There was also the question of whether a particular car would make it up the hill at all. In fact, in these early years, drivers' actual times were not even announced to spectators.


Multimedia

DateMedia or Collection Name & DetailsFiles
22 July 20172017 Classic Nostalgia at Shelsley Walsh Review
Matthew Hubbard, Speedmonkey

Photo Collection Page


Article Index

DateArticleAuthor/Source
23 July 20172017 Classic Nostalgia at Shelsley Walsh Review Matthew Hubbard, Speedmonkey


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