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Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II

American Government Special Collections Reference Desk

American Government

Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II

House of Representatives
Congressional Record: 114th Congress
July 15, 2015


Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 362, I call up the bill (H.R. 3038) to provide an extension of Federal-aid highway, highway safety, motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs funded out of the Highway Trust Fund, and for other purposes, and ask for its immediate consideration.

The Clerk read the title of the bill.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 362, the bill is considered read.

The text of the bill is as follows:

H.R. 3038
 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; RECONCILIATION OF FUNDS; TABLE OF CONTENTS.
 (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II''.
 (b) Reconciliation of Funds.--The Secretary of Transportation shall reduce the amount apportioned or allocated for a program, project, or activity under this Act in fiscal year 2015 by amounts apportioned or allocated pursuant to the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014 and the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, including the amendments made by such Acts, for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015.
 (c) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as follows:
Sec..1..Short title; reconciliation of funds; table of contents.
TITLE I--SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM EXTENSION
Subtitle A--Federal-Aid Highways
Sec..1001..Extension of Federal-aid highway programs.
Sec..1002..Administrative expenses.
Subtitle B--Extension of Highway Safety Programs
Sec..1101..Extension of National Highway Traffic Safety Administration highway safety programs.
Sec..1102..Extension of Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration programs.
Sec..1103..Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act.
Subtitle C--Public Transportation Programs
Sec..1201..Formula grants for rural areas.
Sec..1202..Apportionment of appropriations for formula grants.
Sec..1203..Authorizations for public transportation.
Sec..1204..Bus and bus facilities formula grants.
Subtitle D--Hazardous Materials
Sec..1301..Authorization of appropriations.
TITLE II--REVENUE PROVISIONS
Sec..2001..Extension of Highway Trust Fund expenditure authority.
Sec..2002..Funding of Highway Trust Fund.
Sec..2003..Modification of mortgage reporting requirements.
Sec..2004..Consistent basis reporting between estate and person acquiring property from decedent.
Sec..2005..Clarification of 6-year statute of limitations in case of overstatement of basis.
Sec..2006..Tax return due dates.
Sec..2007..Transfers of excess pension assets to retiree health accounts.
Sec..2008..Equalization of Highway Trust Fund excise taxes on liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, and compressed natural gas.
TITLE III--ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS
Sec..3001..Service fees.

TITLE I--SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM EXTENSION

Subtitle A--Federal-Aid Highways
SEC. 1001. EXTENSION OF FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAY PROGRAMS.
 (a) In General.--Section 1001(a) of the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014 (128 Stat. 1840) is amended by striking ``July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``December 18, 2015''.
 (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
 (1) HIGHWAY TRUST FUND.--Section 1001(b)(1) of the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014 (128 Stat. 1840) is amended to read as follows:
 ``(1) HIGHWAY TRUST FUND.--Except as provided in section 1002, there is authorized to be appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account)--
 ``(A) for fiscal year 2015, a sum equal to the total amount authorized to be appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for programs, projects, and activities for fiscal year 2014 under divisions A and E of MAP-21 (Public Law 112-141) and title 23, United States Code (excluding chapter 4 of that title); and
 ``(B) for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015, \79/366\ of the total amount authorized to be appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for programs, projects, and activities for fiscal year 2015 under divisions A and E of MAP-21 (Public Law 112-141) and title 23, United States Code (excluding chapter 4 of that title).''.
 (2) GENERAL FUND.--Section 1123(h)(1) of MAP-21 (23 U.S.C. 202 note) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $24,986,301 out of the general fund of the Treasury to carry out the program for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $6,475,410 out of the general fund of the Treasury to carry out the program for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (c) Use of Funds.--
 (1) IN GENERAL.--Section 1001(c)(1) of the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014 (128 Stat. 1840) is amended by striking ``(1) IN GENERAL.--'' and all that follows through ``to carry out programs'' and inserting the following:
 ``(1) IN GENERAL.--Except as otherwise expressly provided in this subtitle, funds authorized to be appropriated under subsection (b)(1)--
 ``(A) for fiscal year 2015 shall be distributed, administered, limited, and made available for obligation in the same manner and at the same levels as the amounts of funds authorized to be appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for fiscal year 2014; and
 ``(B) for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015, shall be distributed, administered, limited, and made available for obligation in the same manner and at the same levels as \79/366\ of the amounts of funds authorized to be appropriated out of the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) for fiscal year 2015,
to carry out programs''.
 (2) OBLIGATION CEILING.--Section 1102 of MAP-21 (23 U.S.C. 104 note) is amended--
 (A) in subsection (a)--
 (i) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (2); and
 (ii) by striking paragraph (3) and inserting the following:
 ``(3) $40,256,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(4) $8,689,136,612 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.'';
 (B) in subsection (b)(12)--
 (i) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2014'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015''; and
 (ii) by striking ``, and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015, only in an amount equal to $639,000,000, less any reductions that would have otherwise been required for that year by section 251A of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901a), then multiplied by \304/365\ for that period'' and inserting ``, and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015, only in an amount equal to $639,000,000, less any reductions that would have otherwise been required for that year by section 251A of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901a), then multiplied by \79/366\ for that period'';
 (C) in subsection (c)--
 (i) in the matter preceding paragraph (1) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2014 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''; and
 (ii) in paragraph (2) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) by striking ``for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015, that is equal to \304/365\ of such unobligated balance'' and inserting ``for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015, that is equal to \79/366\ of such unobligated balance'';
 (D) in subsection (d) in the matter preceding paragraph (1) by striking ``2015'' and inserting ``2016''; and
 (E) in subsection (f)(1) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2014 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
SEC. 1002. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.
 Section 1002 of the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2014 (128 Stat. 1842) is amended--
 (1) in subsection (a) by striking ``for administrative expenses of the Federal-aid highway program $366,465,753 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015.'' and inserting ``for administrative expenses of the Federal-aid highway program--
 ``(1) $440,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(2) $94,972,678 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''; and
 (2) by striking subsection (b)(2) and inserting the following:
 ``(2) for fiscal year 2015 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015, subject to the limitations on administrative expenses under the heading `Federal Highway Administration' in appropriations Acts that apply, respectively, to that fiscal year and period.''.

Subtitle B--Extension of Highway Safety Programs
SEC. 1101. EXTENSION OF NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAMS.
 (a) Extension of Programs.--
 (1) HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAMS.--Section 31101(a)(1) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
 (A) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B); and
 (B) by striking subparagraph (C) and inserting the following:
 ``(C) $235,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(D) $50,724,044 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (2) HIGHWAY SAFETY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.--Section 31101(a)(2) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
 (A) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B); and
 (B) by striking subparagraph (C) and inserting the following:
 ``(C) $113,500,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(D) $24,498,634 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (3) NATIONAL PRIORITY SAFETY PROGRAMS.--Section 31101(a)(3) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
 (A) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B); and
 (B) by striking subparagraph (C) and inserting the following:
 ``(C) $272,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(D) $58,710,383 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (4) NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER.--Section 31101(a)(4) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
 (A) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B); and
 (B) by striking subparagraph (C) and inserting the following:
 ``(C) $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(D) $1,079,235 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (5) HIGH VISIBILITY ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM.--
 (A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.--Section 31101(a)(5) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
 (i) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B); and
 (ii) by striking subparagraph (C) and inserting the following:
 ``(C) $29,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(D) $6,259,563 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (B) LAW ENFORCEMENT CAMPAIGNS.--Section 2009(a) of SAFETEA-LU (23 U.S.C. 402 note) is amended--
 (i) in the first sentence by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and in the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and in the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''; and
 (ii) in the second sentence by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and in the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and in the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
 (6) ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.--Section 31101(a)(6) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended--
 (A) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B); and
 (B) by striking subparagraph (C) and inserting the following:
 ``(C) $25,500,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(D) $5,504,098 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (b) Cooperative Research and Evaluation.--Section 403(f)(1) of title 23, United States Code, is amended by striking ``each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2014, and $2,082,192 of the total amount available for apportionment to the States for highway safety programs under section 402(c) in the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2015, and $539,617 of the total amount available for apportionment to the States for highway safety programs under section 402(c) in the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
 (c) Applicability of Title 23.--Section 31101(c) of MAP-21 (126 Stat. 733) is amended by striking ``fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
SEC. 1102. EXTENSION OF FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION PROGRAMS.
 (a) Motor Carrier Safety Grants.--Section 31104(a) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (9); and
 (2) by striking paragraph (10) and inserting the following:
 ``(10) $218,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(11) $47,054,645 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (b) Administrative Expenses.--Section 31104(i)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (I); and
 (2) by striking subparagraph (J) and inserting the following:
 ``(J) $259,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(K) $55,904,372 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (c) Grant Programs.--
 (1) COMMERCIAL DRIVER'

S LICENSE PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.--Section 4101(c)(1) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $24,986,301 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $6,475,410 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (2) BORDER ENFORCEMENT GRANTS.--Section 4101(c)(2) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $26,652,055 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $6,907,104 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (3) PERFORMANCE AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT GRANT PROGRAM.--Section 4101(c)(3) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $4,164,384 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $1,079,235 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (4) COMMERCIAL VEHICLE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM.--Section 4101(c)(4) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $20,821,918 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $5,396,175 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (5) SAFETY DATA IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.--Section 4101(c)(5) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1715) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $2,498,630 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $647,541 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (d) High-priority Activities.--Section 31104(k)(2) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2006 through 2014 and up to $12,493,151 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2006 through 2015 and up to $3,237,705 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
 (e) New Entrant Audits.--Section 31144(g)(5)(B) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``per fiscal year and up to $26,652,055 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``per fiscal year and up to $6,907,104 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
 (f) Outreach and Education.--Section 4127(e) of SAFETEA-LU (119 Stat. 1741) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $3,331,507 to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $863,388 to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
 (g) Grant Program for Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators.--Section 4134(c) of SAFETEA-LU (49 U.S.C. 31301 note) is amended by striking ``each of fiscal years 2005 through 2014 and $832,877 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2005 through 2015 and $215,847 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
SEC. 1103. DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACT.
 Section 4 of the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act (16 U.S.C. 777c) is amended--
 (1) in subsection (a) in the matter preceding paragraph (1) by striking ``each fiscal year through 2014 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``each fiscal year through 2015 and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''; and
 (2) in subsection (b)(1)(A) by striking ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2014, and for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2015, and for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.

Subtitle C--Public Transportation Programs
SEC. 1201. FORMULA GRANTS FOR RURAL AREAS.
 Section 5311(c)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2014, and $4,164,384 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2015, and $1,079,235 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''; and
 (2) in subparagraph (B) by striking ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2014, and $20,821,918 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2015, and $5,396,175 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
SEC. 1202. APPORTIONMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR FORMULA GRANTS.
 Section 5336(h)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2014, and $24,986,301 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``for each fiscal year ending before October 1, 2015, and $6,475,410 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
SEC. 1203. AUTHORIZATIONS FOR PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION.
 (a) Formula Grants.--Section 5338(a) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) in paragraph (1) by striking ``and $7,158,575,342 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$8,595,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $1,855,204,918 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015'';
 (2) in paragraph (2)--
 (A) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``and $107,274,521 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$128,800,000 for fiscal 2015, and $27,801,093 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (B) in subparagraph (B) by striking ``for each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $8,328,767 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``for each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $2,158,470 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (C) in subparagraph (C) by striking ``and $3,713,505,753 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$4,458,650,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $962,386,202 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (D) in subparagraph (D) by striking ``and $215,132,055 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$258,300,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $55,753,279 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (E) in subparagraph (E)--
 (i) by striking ``and $506,222,466 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$607,800,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $131,191,803 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (ii) by striking ``and $24,986,301 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$30,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $6,475,410 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''; and
 (iii) by striking ``and $16,657,534 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$20,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $4,316,940 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (F) in subparagraph (F) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $2,498,630 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $647,541 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (G) in subparagraph (G) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $4,164,384 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $1,079,235 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (H) in subparagraph (H) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $3,206,575 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $831,011 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (I) in subparagraph (I) by striking ``and $1,803,927,671 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$2,165,900,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $467,503,005 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (J) in subparagraph (J) by striking ``and $356,304,658 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$427,800,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $92,339,344 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''; and
 (K) in subparagraph (K) by striking ``and $438,009,863 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``$525,900,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $113,513,934 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
 (b) Research, Development Demonstration and Deployment Projects.--Section 5338(b) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and $58,301,370 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$70,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $15,109,290 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (c) Transit Cooperative Research Program.--Section 5338(c) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and $5,830,137 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$7,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $1,510,929 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (d) Technical Assistance and Standards Development.--Section 5338(d) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and $5,830,137 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$7,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $1,510,929 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (e) Human Resources and Training.--Section 5338(e) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and $4,164,384 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$5,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $1,079,235 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (f) Capital Investment Grants.--Section 5338(g) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``and $1,558,295,890 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$1,907,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $411,620,219 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015''.
 (g) Administration.--Section 5338(h) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) in paragraph (1) by striking ``and $86,619,178 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015'' and inserting ``$104,000,000 for fiscal year 2015, and $22,448,087 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015'';
 (2) in paragraph (2) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and not less than $4,164,384 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and not less than $1,079,235 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''; and
 (3) in paragraph (3) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and not less than $832,877 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and not less than $215,847 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.
SEC. 1204. BUS AND BUS FACILITIES FORMULA GRANTS.
 Section 5339(d)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) by striking ``each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $54,553,425 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $14,137,978 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,'';
 (2) by striking ``$1,041,096 for such period'' and inserting ``$269,809 for such period''; and
 (3) by striking ``$416,438 for such period'' and inserting ``$107,923 for such period''.

Subtitle D--Hazardous Materials
SEC. 1301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
 (a) In General.--Section 5128(a) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (2); and
 (2) by striking paragraph (3) and inserting the following:
 ``(3) $42,762,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
 ``(4) $9,230,049 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015.''.
 (b) Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Fund.--Section 5128(b) of title 49, United States Code, is amended--
 (1) in paragraph (1)--
 (A) in the paragraph heading by striking ``FISCAL YEARS 2013 AND 2014'' and inserting ``FISCAL YEARS 2013 THROUGH 2015''; and
 (B) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) by striking ``fiscal years 2013 and 2014'' and inserting ``fiscal years 2013 through 2015''; and
 (2) by striking paragraph (2) and inserting the following:
 ``(2) FISCAL YEAR 2016.--From the Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Fund established under section 5116(i), the Secretary may expend for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015--
 ``(A) $40,579 to carry out section 5115;
 ``(B) $4,705,464 to carry out subsections (a) and (b) of section 5116, of which not less than $2,946,311 shall be available to carry out section 5116(b);
 ``(C) $32,377 to carry out section 5116(f);
 ``(D) $134,904 to publish and distribute the Emergency Response Guidebook under section 5116(i)(3); and
 ``(E) $215,847 to carry out section 5116(j).''.
 (c) Hazardous Materials Training Grants.--Section 5128(c) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking ``each of the fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and $3,331,507 for the period beginning on October 1, 2014, and ending on July 31, 2015,'' and inserting ``each of fiscal years 2013 through 2015 and $863,388 for the period beginning on October 1, 2015, and ending on December 18, 2015,''.

TITLE II--REVENUE PROVISIONS
SEC. 2001. EXTENSION OF HIGHWAY TRUST FUND EXPENDITURE AUTHORITY.
 (a) Highway Trust Fund.--Section 9503 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended--
 (1) by striking ``August 1, 2015'' in subsections (b)(6)(B), (c)(1), and (e)(3) and inserting ``December 19, 2015'', and
 (2) by striking ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015'' in subsections (c)(1) and (e)(3) and inserting ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II''.
 (b) Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund.--Section 9504 of such Code is amended--
 (1) by striking ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015'' each place it appears in subsection (b)(2) and inserting ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II'', and
 (2) by striking ``August 1, 2015'' in subsection (d)(2) and inserting ``December 19, 2015''.
 (c) Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund.--Section 9508(e)(2) of such Code is amended by striking ``August 1, 2015'' and inserting ``December 19, 2015''.
SEC. 2002. FUNDING OF HIGHWAY TRUST FUND.
 Section 9503(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by redesignating paragraph (7) as paragraph (8) and by inserting after paragraph (6) the following new paragraph:
 ``(7) ADDITIONAL SUMS.--Out of money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, there is hereby appropriated--
 ``(A) $6,068,000,000 to the Highway Account (as defined in subsection (e)(5)(B)) in the Highway Trust Fund; and
 ``(B) $2,000,000,000 to the Mass Transit Account in the Highway Trust Fund.''.
SEC. 2003. MODIFICATION OF MORTGAGE REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.
 (a) Information Return Requirements.--Section 6050H(b)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (C), by redesignating subparagraph (D) as subparagraph (G) and by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following new subparagraphs:
 ``(D) the amount of outstanding principal on the mortgage as of the beginning of such calendar year,
 ``(E) the date of the origination of the mortgage,
 ``(F) the address (or other description in the case of property without an address) of the property which secures the mortgage, and''.
 (b) Statements to Individuals.--Section 6050H(d)(2) of such Code is amended by striking ``subsection (b)(2)(C)'' and inserting ``subparagraphs (C), (D), (E), and (F) of subsection (b)(2)''.
 (c) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section shall apply to returns required to be made, and statements required to be furnished, after December 31, 2016.
SEC. 2004. CONSISTENT BASIS REPORTING BETWEEN ESTATE AND PERSON ACQUIRING PROPERTY FROM DECEDENT.
 (a) Property Acquired From a Decedent.--Section 1014 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
 ``(f) Basis Must Be Consistent With Estate Tax Return.--For purposes of this section--
 ``(1) IN GENERAL.--The basis of any property to which subsection (a) applies shall not exceed--
 ``(A) in the case of property the final value of which has been determined for purposes of the tax imposed by chapter 11 on the estate of such decedent, such value, and
 ``(B) in the case of property not described in subparagraph (A) and with respect to which a statement has been furnished under section 6035(a) identifying the value of such property, such value.
 ``(2) EXCEPTION.--Paragraph (1) shall only apply to any property whose inclusion in the decedent's estate increased the liability for the tax imposed by chapter 11 (reduced by credits allowable against such tax) on such estate.
 ``(3) DETERMINATION.--For purposes of paragraph (1), the basis of property has been determined for purposes of the tax imposed by chapter 11 if--
 ``(A) the value of such property is shown on a return under section 6018 and such value is not contested by the Secretary before the expiration of the time for assessing a tax under chapter 11,
 ``(B) in a case not described in subparagraph (A), the value is specified by the Secretary and such value is not timely contested by the executor of the estate, or
 ``(C) the value is determined by a court or pursuant to a settlement agreement with the Secretary.
 ``(4) REGULATIONS.--The Secretary may by regulations provide exceptions to the application of this subsection.''.
 (b) Information Reporting.--
 (1) IN GENERAL.--Subpart A of part III of subchapter A of chapter 61 of such Code is amended by inserting after section 6034A the following new section:
``SEC. 6035. BASIS INFORMATION TO PERSONS ACQUIRING PROPERTY FROM DECEDENT.
 ``(a) Information With Respect to Property Acquired From Decedents.--
 ``(1) IN GENERAL.--The executor of any estate required to file a return under section 6018(a) shall furnish to the Secretary and to each person acquiring any interest in property included in the decedent's gross estate for Federal estate tax purposes a statement identifying the value of each interest in such property as reported on such return and such other information with respect to such interest as the Secretary may prescribe.
 ``(2) STATEMENTS BY BENEFICIARIES.--Each person required to file a return under section 6018(b) shall furnish to the Secretary and to each other person who holds a legal or beneficial interest in the property to which such return relates a statement identifying the information described in paragraph (1).
 ``(3) TIME FOR FURNISHING STATEMENT.--
 ``(A) IN GENERAL.--Each statement required to be furnished under paragraph (1) or (2) shall be furnished at such time as the Secretary may prescribe, but in no case at a time later than the earlier of--
 ``(i) the date which is 30 days after the date on which the return under section 6018 was required to be filed (including extensions, if any), or
 ``(ii) the date which is 30 days after the date such return is filed.
 ``(B) ADJUSTMENTS.--In any case in which there is an adjustment to the information required to be included on a statement filed under paragraph (1) or (2) after such statement has been filed, a supplemental statement under such paragraph shall be filed not later than the date which is 30 days after such adjustment is made.
 ``(b) Regulations.--The Secretary shall prescribe such regulations as necessary to carry out this section, including regulations relating to--
 ``(1) the application of this section to property with regard to which no estate tax return is required to be filed, and
 ``(2) situations in which the surviving joint tenant or other recipient may have better information than the executor regarding the basis or fair market value of the property.''.
 (2) PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO FILE.--
 (A) RETURN.--Section 6724(d)(1) of such Code is amended by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph (B), by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (C) and inserting ``, and'', and by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
 ``(D) any statement required to be filed with the Secretary under section 6035.''.
 (B) STATEMENT.--Section 6724(d)(2) of such Code is amended by striking ``or'' at the end of subparagraph (GG), by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (HH) and inserting ``, or'', and by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
 ``(II) section 6035 (other than a statement described in paragraph (1)(D)).''.
 (3) CLERICAL AMENDMENT.--The table of sections for subpart A of part III of subchapter A of chapter 61 of such Code is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 6034A the following new item:
``Sec..6035..Basis information to persons acquiring property from decedent.''.
 (c) Penalty for Inconsistent Reporting.-- 
	
	(1) IN GENERAL.--Section 6662(b) of such Code is amended by inserting after paragraph (7) the following new paragraph:
 ``(8) Any inconsistent estate basis.''.
 (2) INCONSISTENT BASIS REPORTING.--Section 6662 of such Code is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
 ``(k) Inconsistent Estate Basis Reporting.--For purposes of this section, there is an `inconsistent estate basis' if the basis of property claimed on a return exceeds the basis as determined under section 1014(f).''.
 (d) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section shall apply to property with respect to which an estate tax return is filed after the date of the enactment of this Act.
SEC. 2005. CLARIFICATION OF 6-YEAR STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS IN CASE OF OVERSTATEMENT OF BASIS.
 (a) In General.--Section 6501(e)(1)(B) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended--
 (1) by striking ``and'' at the end of clause (i), by redesignating clause (ii) as clause (iii), and by inserting after clause (i) the following new clause:
 ``(ii) An understatement of gross income by reason of an overstatement of unrecovered cost or other basis is an omission from gross income; and'', and
 (2) by inserting ``(other than in the case of an overstatement of unrecovered cost or other basis)'' in clause (iii) (as so redesignated) after ``In determining the amount omitted from gross income''.
 (b) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section shall apply to--
 (1) returns filed after the date of the enactment of this Act, and
 (2) returns filed on or before such date if the period specified in section 6501 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (determined without regard to such amendments) for assessment of the taxes with respect to which such return relates has not expired as of such date.
SEC. 2006. TAX RETURN DUE DATES.
 (a) Due Dates for Returns of Partnerships, S Corporations, and C Corporations.--
 (1) PARTNERSHIPS AND S CORPORATIONS.--
 (A) IN GENERAL.--So much of subsection (b) of 6072 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as precedes the second sentence thereof is amended to read as follows:
 ``(b) Returns of Partnerships and S Corporations.--Returns of partnerships under section 6031 and returns of S corporations under sections 6012 and 6037 made on the basis of the calendar year shall be filed on or before the 15th day of March following the close of the calendar year, and such returns made on the basis of a fiscal year shall be filed on or before the 15th day of the third month following the close of the fiscal year.''.
 (B) CONFORMING AMENDMENT.--Section 6072(a) of such Code is amended by striking ``6017, or 6031'' and inserting ``or 6017''.
 (2) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS RELATING TO C CORPORATION DUE DATE OF 15TH DAY OF FOURTH MONTH FOLLOWING TAXABLE YEAR.--
 (A) Section 170(a)(2)(B) of such Code is amended by striking ``third month'' and inserting ``fourth month''.
 (B) Section 563 of such Code is amended by striking ``third month'' each place it appears and inserting ``fourth month''.
 (C) Section 1354(d)(1)(B)(i) of such Code is amended by striking ``3d month'' and inserting ``4th month''.
 (D) Subsections (a) and (c) of section 6167 of such Code are each amended by striking ``third month'' and inserting ``fourth month''.
 (E) Section 6425(a)(1) of such Code is amended by striking ``third month'' and inserting ``fourth month''.
 (F) Subsections (b)(2)(A), (g)(3), and (h)(1) of section 6655 of such Code are each amended by striking ``3rd month'' and inserting ``4th month''.
 (G) Section 6655(g)(4) of such Code is amended by redesignating subparagraph (E) as subparagraph (F) and by inserting after subparagraph (D) the following new subparagraph:
 ``(E) Subsection (b)(2)(A) shall be applied by substituting `3rd month' for `4th month'.''.
 (3) EFFECTIVE DATES.--
 (A) IN GENERAL.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the amendments made by this subsection shall apply to returns for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2015.
 (B) SPECIAL RULE FOR C CORPORATIONS WITH FISCAL YEARS ENDING ON JUNE 30.--In the case of any C corporation with a taxable year ending on June 30, the amendments made by this subsection shall apply to returns for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2025.
 (b) Modification of Due Dates by Regulation.--In the case of returns for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2015, the Secretary of the Treasury, or the Secretary's designee, shall modify appropriate regulations to provide as follows:
 (1) The maximum extension for the returns of partnerships filing Form 1065 shall be a 6-month period ending on September 15 for calendar year taxpayers.
 (2) The maximum extension for the returns of trusts filing Form 1041 shall be a 5 1/2 -month period ending on September 30 for calendar year taxpayers.
 (3) The maximum extension for the returns of employee benefit plans filing Form 5500 shall be an automatic 3 1/2 -month period ending on November 15 for calendar year plans.
 (4) The maximum extension for the returns of organizations exempt from income tax filing Form 990 (series) shall be an automatic 6-month period ending on November 15 for calendar year filers.
 (5) The maximum extension for the returns of organizations exempt from income tax that are required to file Form 4720 returns of excise taxes shall be an automatic 6-month period beginning on the due date for filing the return (without regard to any extensions).
 (6) The maximum extension for the returns of trusts required to file Form 5227 shall be an automatic 6-month period beginning on the due date for filing the return (without regard to any extensions).
 (7) The maximum extension for filing Form 6069, Return of Excise Tax on Excess Contributions to Black Lung Benefit Trust Under Section 4953 and Computation of Section 192 Deduction, shall be an automatic 6-month period beginning on the due date for filing the return (without regard to any extensions).
 (8) The maximum extension for a taxpayer required to file Form 8870 shall be an automatic 6-month period beginning on the due date for filing the return (without regard to any extensions).
 (9) The due date of Form 3520-A, Annual Information Return of a Foreign Trust with a United States Owner, shall be the 15th day of the 3d month after the close of the trust's taxable year, and the maximum extension shall be a 6-month period beginning on such day.
 (10) The due date of Form 3520, Annual Return to Report Transactions with Foreign Trusts and Receipt of Certain Foreign Gifts, for calendar year filers shall be April 15 with a maximum extension for a 6-month period ending on October 15.
 (11) The due date of FinCEN Report 114 (relating to Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts) shall be April 15 with a maximum extension for a 6-month period ending on October 15 and with provision for an extension under rules similar to the rules in Treas. Reg. section 1.6081-5. For any taxpayer required to file such Form for the first time, any penalty for failure to timely request for, or file, an extension, may be waived by the Secretary.
 (c) Corporations Permitted Statutory Automatic 6-month Extension of Income Tax Returns.--
 (1) IN GENERAL.--Section 6081(b) of such Code is amended--
 (A) by striking ``3 months'' and inserting ``6 months'', and
 (B) by adding at the end the following: ``In the case of any return for a taxable year of a C corporation which ends on December 31 and begins before January 1, 2026, the first sentence of this subsection shall be applied by substituting `5 months' for `6 months'. In the case of any return for a taxable year of a C corporation which ends on June 30 and begins before January 1, 2026, the first sentence of this subsection shall be applied by substituting `7 months' for `6 months'.''.
 (2) EFFECTIVE DATE.--The amendments made by this subsection shall apply to returns for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2015.
SEC. 2007. TRANSFERS OF EXCESS PENSION ASSETS TO RETIREE HEALTH ACCOUNTS.
 (a) In General.--Section 420(b)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking ``December 31, 2021'' and inserting ``December 31, 2025''.
 (b) Conforming ERISA Amendments.--
 (1) Sections 101(e)(3), 403(c)(1), and 408(b)(13) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1021(e)(3), 1103(c)(1), 1108(b)(13)) are each amended by striking ``MAP-21' '' and inserting ``Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II''.
 (2) Section 408(b)(13) of such Act (29 U.S.C. 1108(b)(13)) is amended by striking ``January 1, 2022'' and inserting ``January 1, 2026''.
SEC. 2008. EQUALIZATION OF HIGHWAY TRUST FUND EXCISE TAXES ON LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS, LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS, AND COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS.
 (a) Liquefied Petroleum Gas.--
 (1) IN GENERAL.--Section 4041(a)(2)(B) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking ``and'' at the end of clause (i), by redesignating clause (ii) as clause (iii), and by inserting after clause (i) the following new clause:
 ``(ii) in the case of liquefied petroleum gas, 18.3 cents per energy equivalent of a gallon of gasoline, and''.
 (2) ENERGY EQUIVALENT OF A GALLON OF GASOLINE.--Section 4041(a)(2) of such Code is amended by adding at the end the following:
 ``(C) ENERGY EQUIVALENT OF A GALLON OF GASOLINE.--For purposes of this paragraph, the term `energy equivalent of a gallon of gasoline' means, with respect to a liquefied petroleum gas fuel, the amount of such fuel having a Btu content of 115,400 (lower heating value). For purposes of the preceding sentence, a Btu content of 115,400 (lower heating value) is equal to 5.75 pounds of liquefied petroleum gas.''.
 (b) Liquefied Natural Gas.--
 (1) IN GENERAL.--Section 4041(a)(2)(B) of such Code, as amended by subsection (a)(1), is amended by striking ``and'' at the end of clause (ii), by striking the period at the end of clause (iii) and inserting ``, and'' and by inserting after clause (iii) the following new clause:
 ``(iv) in the case of liquefied natural gas, 24.3 cents per energy equivalent of a gallon of diesel.''.
 (2) ENERGY EQUIVALENT OF A GALLON OF DIESEL.--Section 4041(a)(2) of such Code, as amended by subsection (a)(2), is amended by adding at the end the following:
 ``(D) ENERGY EQUIVALENT OF A GALLON OF DIESEL.--For purposes of this paragraph, the term `energy equivalent of a gallon of diesel' means, with respect to a liquefied natural gas fuel, the amount of such fuel having a Btu content of 128,700 (lower heating value). For purposes of the preceding sentence, a Btu content of 128,700 (lower heating value) is equal to 6.06 pounds of liquefied natural gas.''.
 (3) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.--Section 4041(a)(2)(B)(iii) of such Code, as redesignated by subsection (a)(1), is amended--
 (A) by striking ``liquefied natural gas,'', and
 (B) by striking ``peat), and'' and inserting ``peat) and''.
 (c) Energy Equivalent of a Gallon of Gasoline to Compressed Natural Gas.--Section 4041(a)(3) of such Code is amended by adding at the end the following:
 ``(D) ENERGY EQUIVALENT OF A GALLON OF GASOLINE.--For purposes of this paragraph, the term `energy equivalent of a gallon of gasoline' means 5.66 pounds of compressed natural gas.''.
 (d) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section shall apply to any sale or use of fuel after December 31, 2015.

TITLE III--ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS
SEC. 3001. SERVICE FEES.
 Paragraph (4) of section 44940(i) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new subparagraphs:
 ``(K) $1,560,000,000 for fiscal year 2024.
 ``(L) $1,600,000,000 for fiscal year 2025.''.


The SPEAKER pro tempore. The bill shall be debatable for 1 hour, equally divided among and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the chair of ranking minority member of the Committee on Ways and Means.

The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Shuster), the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. DeFazio), the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Ryan), and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Levin), each will control 15 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Shuster).

GENERAL LEAVE

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to include extraneous materials on the bill, H.R. 3038.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Pennsylvania?

There was no objection.

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 3038, the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part II.

This bill extends the Federal surface transportation programs through December 18, 2015. H.R. 3038 is a clean extension and funds the programs at authorized levels for fiscal year 2014.

The bill also ensures the solvency of the highway trust fund. We have an immediate, critical need to address the solvency of the trust fund and extend the current surface transportation law.

If Congress fails to act, the States will not be able to be reimbursed for past expenses, transportation projects, and jobs across the country will be at risk; and over 4,000 U.S. Department of Transportation employees will be furloughed.

I appreciate Chairman Ryan's attention to this pressing issue, as well as his commitment to addressing the solvency of the trust fund.

A long-term surface transportation reauthorization bill remains a top priority for this committee, and it should be for this Congress.

I am committed to continuing to work with Chairman Ryan, Ranking Member DeFazio, and others on achieving a long-term reauthorization bill. I believe this extension gives us our best shot.

I strongly urge all Members to support H.R. 3038, and I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Ironically, it was exactly 1 year ago today that the chairman of the Ways and Means Committee said they needed time to come together for funding a 6-year surface transportation bill investing in our transportation system, 1 year ago today.

There was an extension until the end of the year, then there was an extension until May, and then there was an extension from May until now--temporary extensions, I think 34 temporary extensions we have seen now.

Now, we are talking about another temporary extension with the hope that maybe they can find some money under the couch cushions or pass tax reform and cut taxes on rich people and use dynamic scoring and say it raises money and then put it in the trust fund. I don't know what their solution is.

We have had a user fee funded transportation system in this country since Dwight David Eisenhower was President, followed by Ronald Reagan who doubled the tax; and Ronald Reagan also put transit into the highway trust fund, saying we should not ignore our population centers and actually our centers of economic growth.

Then in 1993--granted, Democratic President and Democratic Congress, but we didn't quite have the votes to increase the gas tax--and Bud Shuster, Republican chair of the Transportation Committee back then, actual relation to current chairman, he brought us quite a number of Republicans to vote with the Democrats to go to 18.3 cents a gallon; and there it stood since 1993.

We are hearing now you can't increase the gas tax, so I have offered alternatives. Let's eliminate the gas tax and put a tax on a barrel of oil, the fraction that goes into taxable transportation uses, which economists say means Wall Street might eat part of that because they are speculating so much, ExxonMobil might eat part of that, OPEC--hey, we might get Saudi Arabia to pay for a little bit of our infrastructure; but I am told, no, they can't do that.

I proposed just indexing the existing gas tax and bonding, pay it back over time with that increment. Now, if we double index the gas tax, it might go up 1.7 cents next year. There is apparently a fear in this place that if gas went up 1.7 cents a gallon--unlike ExxonMobil jacking it up 25 cents while you are driving by in May because Memorial Day is coming--but of the Federal Government to invest in filling in the potholes, fixing the bridges and the transit systems and raised it 1.7 cents, oh, my God, people lose their elections.

Well, we have seen six Republican States raise their gas tax this year, all red, deep red States; and those same States have said to us in testimony: It is not enough that we are raising the gas tax; we need more Federal investment.

The system is falling apart--140,000 bridges, 140,000 need repair or replacement. Forty percent of the surface national highway system needs to be not just resurfaced; it needs to be dug up and rebuilt--and that our transit systems, $84 billion backlog to bring them up to a state of good repair.

It is so bad in Washington, D.C., that they are killing people; they are killing people on the transit system because it is so outmoded.

Now, if we made those investments and we made them in a more robust level than we are doing now, we could put hundreds of thousands of Americans to work. It is not just construction workers; you are talking manufacturing; you are talking small business; you are talking minority business enterprises; you are talking engineering; you are talking technical.

The Buy America requirements are the strongest in the whole government. It would have an incredible stimulative effect on the economy. In addition, it would put 300,000 people back to work, and we could begin to climb back toward where we were.

Dwight David Eisenhower gave us a system that was the envy of the world. We were number one in infrastructure. We are now 16. We are dropping like a rock. Pretty soon, we will be down there with Third World countries in terms of state of our infrastructure in this country. It is embarrassing. It is pathetic. It is not necessary.

Today, we should be considering a long-term bill. We have introduced a viable long-term bill. We propose today a way to pay for the first 2 years of it by just saying Benedict Arnold corporations can't buy a drugstore overseas for a major pharmaceutical company and then say: Oh, that is our home headquarters, although we are still here enjoying all the protections of American citizenship law and our military, but we don't want to pay for it and our infrastructure.

There are ways forward. There seems to be an incredible reluctance on their side, so here we are again saying let's do a patch until December 18. Meanwhile, the Senate over there has been in who knows what kind of circles. They are proposing to get most of the money by reducing retirement for Federal employees. Now, that is a tremendous relationship to infrastructure and user fees. Let's not get too far away from the idea of user pays.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Louisiana (Mr. Graves).

Mr. GRAVES of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, I want to make note, the highway program funding mechanism expires at the end of this month. It expires; that means it runs out of funding. Voting against this bill causes the program to shut down, causes a decline, a dropoff on investment in our Nation's infrastructure.

Right now, we are seeing growth; we are seeing increasing demand. As the gentleman from Oregon just noted, we are seeing underinvestment in our infrastructure system. We have got to increase the investment. We have got to work hard to address the outdated funding mechanism that funds our current highway system. As was noted, we have lost value in the current funding mechanism.

Having a user fee is absolutely critical, but a user fee that ensures the level of investment that we truly need. This extension gives us time to recreate that. We have been using the same user fee for decades, a user fee with static figures since 1993, as was just mentioned, and a user fee that has conflicting Federal policies that reduces the value of the income of this trust fund as a result of the corporate average fuel economy or CAFE standards that require greater fuel efficiency out of vehicles.

We have got to take a fresh look at this. We have got to take this time and use it wisely to ensure that we can ensure the level of funding that we need to invest in our Nation's infrastructure. We need a fundamentally different approach, and we need to do it without raising taxes.

Mr. Speaker, back in my home State of Louisiana, we have some of the worst traffic in the Nation for a region of its size. We have an area that the interstate system, the only place in the Nation where it literally drops down to one lane, the interstate, an incredible bottleneck, in this same area where we are having a manufacturing renaissance, where we are seeing tens of billions of dollars in new economic development opportunities; yet the infrastructure is struggling. The infrastructure is strangling that growth and strangling that investment.

I urge all Members to support this. I urge all Members to work together to ensure we develop a new funding stream that meets the demand of our crumbling infrastructure in this Nation.

I want to thank Chairman Shuster, and I want to thank Chairman Ryan and Ranking Member DeFazio, to ensure that this legislation moves forward.

Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from the District of Columbia (Ms. Norton), the ranking member of the Highways and Transit Subcommittee.

Ms. NORTON. Mr. Speaker, I thank my good friend, the ranking member, for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, the majority has turned virtually its only congressional policy, tax savings, on its head with useless short-term transportation bills and extensions. Their short-term policy on the Nation's highways, bridges, and transit has simply transferred the transportation tax burden to the State taxes of their constituents.

Twenty-one States and the District of Columbia have raised their gas user fees--six since July 1--Iowa, Wyoming, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont, District of Columbia, South Dakota, Idaho, Georgia, Nebraska, and Vermont.

[Time: 14:45]

States going in that direction are Michigan, North Carolina, Utah, and Washington State.

States also considering user fee increases are Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, and South Carolina. That makes almost half the States that Congress has driven to State taxpayers alone, States that have nothing in common except the desire to keep their transportation infrastructure, the key to a growth economy, from completely disintegrating.

Meanwhile, the Representatives in Washington have continually failed to pay their part, on the average, about 50 percent of the costs of State infrastructure with Federal dollars, yet the Federal dollars are only a pass-through that goes right back to the States.

For 22 years, we have allowed the Federal user fee to remain fixed at 1993 levels, although fuel efficiency long ago made that obsolete.

Although American taxpayers have stepped up, they can't do their projects without a Federal long-term bill. In the Nation's capital, for example, the iconic Memorial Bridge, gateway to Arlington Cemetery in the south and, on the north, to the National Mall, is partially closed, leaving thousands of workers unable to take Metro buses to get to work.

Even bridges like the H Street bridge here, which needs only repair, is standing in the way of billions of dollars of nontransportation development here and nationwide.

So whatever the Congress does in the next authorization bill, two things must be done: We must put in pilots that instruct us, guide us, for a new way to fund transportation infrastructure in light of fuel efficiencies, such as cars like my hybrid Ford C-Max.

And, most of all, to be useful at all, we must have a 6-year transportation bill.

Mr. SHUSTER. I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Mica), the former chairman of the committee.

Mr. MICA. Mr. Speaker, here we are. It is the last minute to avoid an infrastructure disaster across the country.

How did we get here? Well, when we knew that we needed a substantial amount of money, the other side of the aisle found out that there was a little bit of money left.

We had asked several months ago to consider going to the end of the year when we are doing tax reform, and we could find sufficient money to fund a 4- to 6-year bill. They said ``no.''

They had to spend the last dime in the cookie jar, take it out of the cookie jar, and that is what put us in this situation. What that has done is at least seven States have almost closed down their infrastructure projects.

My State isn't affected, but some of the northern States are affected because they have a very short work period. So they are missing that work period.

States don't operate like the Federal Government. They have to pay their bills. They can't be spending, producing, and printing paper money without backing. So we have let them down.

So here we are, asking to go where we wanted to go to before December. So I urge the Members to pass this legislation.

It is kind of interesting. Sometimes I think that there is a lot of amnesia around here. Mr. Speaker, I don't know if we could go down to the health clinic downstairs and get a supply of ginkgo, but it would be good to give some of the Members on the other side of the aisle some ginkgo to help their memory.

Three years ago they controlled the House, the Senate, and the White House. They could have passed this legislation they are talking about, funded it, and we would have a bill that would be in place now.

The President came in. I was there. Ray LaHood came in, cut the knees out of Mr. Oberstar when he was chairman and said they weren't going to move forward, they weren't going to raise taxes. Now they call for raising taxes.

Well, 21 States have raised it. They have done the responsible thing, and they have to do it. It is better for them to do it because the overhead and the carrying charge is so great in Washington. So they have to do it.

Going to the well instead of raising gas taxes, now, didn't we recommend that to the other side and they ignored it? I think we need a double dose of ginkgo.

So I think now we step up to the plate and we help Mr. Shuster and Mr. Ryan. They will get us to December. The leadership of the House is committed to a long-term bill, and we will get that done, everybody working together. And maybe a few people having another little dose of ginkgo might help around here.

Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, I must say it is one of the most bizarre and fanciful things I have ever heard. There never was a viable plan to go to year-end. The Republicans never proposed the revenues.

They just recently found revenues under couch cushions to get us through to December 18th. And they have not meaningfully addressed any long-term funding, despite having been in charge 4 1/2 years, and he wants to blame us.

They just held the first hearing ever in Ways and Means on revenues just a couple of weeks ago, and the chairman started by saying, ``No user fees.''

Well, you have now ruled out the traditional way of paying for infrastructure. So they are going to have to come up with something else. But that was totally bizarre.

I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from Maryland (Ms. Edwards).

Ms. EDWARDS. Mr. Speaker, for months Republicans have actually squandered an opportunity to develop and pass a long-term authorization for highway spending, and it is pretty regrettable, since May 19 Republicans simply brought up and passed another 2-month extension.

We have already heard--sometimes we lose count. Is it 33? Is it 34?--extensions. Unfortunately, here we are 2 months later and we are careening yet again to another Republican-made crisis, more gridlock for the highway trust fund, right in the middle of the critical construction season.

Hundreds of thousands of jobs, as has been said, and vital construction projects across the country are really hanging in the balance, and here we just have a few days left. What do we know? We know that Republicans don't have a plan and they don't have any ideas.

Well, we have some ideas, and those ideas are contained in the Grow America Act. I am one of the original cosponsors. It is a 6-year, $478 billion bill that would be a framework for our discussions. We could put that on the floor here today, vote on it, and make sure that we get underway.

But, oh, no, we are stuck yet again with another extension. Frankly, I am not really sure whether, when we get to December, we won't be stuck with yet another extension. This just goes on and on and on. The American people have had enough.

We know that, if we invest in our infrastructure, we create jobs, and we know that our infrastructure is falling apart. So this seems like a no-brainer to most Americans and to working people. And I don't understand what the complication here is, Mr. Speaker, but enough is enough.

It is time for Republicans to be the adults at the table to bring a plan and a program to the floor for a long-term authorization and put America back to work not 6 months at a time, not 2 months at a time, but for a long time.

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I again would like to remind my colleagues that the Senate was controlled up until January by their party. The White House has been controlled for 6 1/2 years by their party.

I know the ranking member at the time when the stimulus came out--as I recall, I believe he voted against the stimulus because they were going to squander $800 billion.

If they would have listened to the ranking member at the time, they would have put much more or a lot more money into the investment of infrastructure. Instead of that $800 billion bill, about $68 billion went to transportation.

So everybody can point fingers at everybody, but the reality is here we are. We need to extend this so that the Ways and Means Committee and the Finance Committee in the Senate can figure out the dollars in a responsible way, not to continue to raise the debt and the deficit, but find a responsible funding level to get us to a 6-year bill, which I am committed to and I know Chairman Ryan has said many, many times in public he is committed to, and our leadership in the House is committed to a long-term bill.

Instead of pointing fingers at each other, let's figure out a way to move forward together, and I believe we will.

I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, could I inquire as to the time left before we proceed?

The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Westmoreland). The gentleman has 4 minutes remaining.

Mr. DeFAZIO. I yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Nolan).

Mr. NOLAN. Mr. Speaker, Members of the House, the simple truth is, as has been articulated so well here today by my colleague, that this Nation desperately needs a long-term transportation funding bill to repair our Nation's crumbling infrastructure, not another kick-the-can-down-the-road, short-term, temporary, convoluted fix.

Last week Congress appropriately honored the late chairman of the Transportation Committee, Jim Oberstar, with the naming of his hometown post office in Chisholm, Minnesota. What a wonderful tribute it was to Chairman Oberstar.

But here we are once again kicking the can down the road on the issue that Jim Oberstar cared most about. As chairman, Jim worked hard to ensure the committee drafted good, strong, bipartisan legislation, and that is what we need here today.

If the Transportation Committee were allowed to do that, I have every confidence that we would indeed write a long-term transportation funding bill.

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that the trains are running off the tracks, the bridges are falling down, the wastewater treatment facilities are overflowing.

So let's do right by our good friend, former Congressman Jim Oberstar, and let's create a long-term fix to our national transportation infrastructure.

Mr. Speaker, I include an article for the Record.

[From The Washington Post, July 14, 2015]

HOUSE HONORS THE LATE REP. JIM OBERSTAR AS CONGRESS FUMBLES HIS GREATEST PASSION

(By Colby Itkowitz)

It was curious timing for House members to honor the late Democratic congressman Jim Oberstar.

On Monday evening, they voted to rename a post office after Oberstar in his hometown of Chisholm, Minn. Several members spoke on the floor about his deep institutional memory, passion for everything transportation and all-around collegiality.

``I'd like to ask that we honor him by rededicating ourselves to that spirit of bipartisanship, that spirit of working together, that spirit of getting things done ..... that was the spirit that epitomized Jim Oberstar and that's how so he was successful in getting things done,'' Rep. Rick Nolan (D-Minn.), who represents Oberstar's former district, said in floor remarks.

But as Oberstar was being memorialized by his former colleagues, a Republican plan was being hatched to place another Band-Aid over the gaping, oozing wound that is federal highway program funding. Whatever short-term fix is agreed to, it will be just another patch to temporarily staunch the bleeding, when what's really needed is invasive surgery.

Oberstar knew this. He had a plan. And when he finally earned the gavel of the Transportation committee in 2007 (he'd begun his career as a young staffer on the then-Public Works panel and then, as a new congressman in 1975, climbed his way up from the lowest rung on the committee dais to the chairman's perch), he thought the Democratic majorities in both chambers and two years later the White House would lead to real investment in transportation.

But there was no political will then, or now, for the easiest immediate solution to ramp up revenue for the starved highway programs--raising the federal gas tax for the first time since 1993. Instead, Congress is poised to find a short-term fix to bailout the Highway Trust Fund for the seventh time since President George W. Bush first shifted money from the general treasury in 2008 to keep the trust fund solvent.

This time, with the highway program set to expire at the end of this month, House Budget Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) wants to find savings through complicated tax compliance rules to patch the highway program as lawmakers continue to fight over how to pay for a multi-year reauthorization, which has evaded Congress for years.

In 2009, when Oberstar released his six-year, $450 billion plan for surface transportation, he warned that the short-term extensions don't allow state departments of transportation the certainty to plan for bigger, more ambitious projects. It's a sentiment that's been echoed by governors, mayors, big business and labor.

Oberstar, who lost his reelection in 2010, believed that if Democrats had passed his bill they would not have lost the House in those mid-term elections because the infrastructure jobs would have been such a boon to the economy.

It's of course impossible to know if that would have been true. But Oberstar, who died in May 2014, would probably feel quite conflicted this week--deeply honored by the post office naming and deeply disheartened that Congress still hasn't made transportation spending a priority.

Mr. SHUSTER. May I inquire as to how much time is remaining?

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Pennsylvania has 7 minutes remaining. The gentleman from Oregon has 3 1/2 minutes remaining.

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Graves), the chairman of the Subcommittee on Surface Transportation.

Mr. GRAVES of Missouri. Mr. Speaker, I want to associate myself with the words of my colleagues, who just spoke obviously on the need to do this and the need for a long-term transportation bill.

I remember Chairman Oberstar working diligently to try to do that in the six, seven extensions, I think, that we had at this time and never did come up with a transportation bill. That is why we are working so hard to make sure we have a good bipartisan bill.

I do rise in support of H.R. 3038. It is going to extend the current transportation law until December 18, 2015, until we can get that long-term bill in place.

As chairman of the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, I believe it is critical for Congress to come together on this bipartisan, long-term, surface transportation reauthorization bill.

In my home State of Missouri, we have nearly 35,000 highway miles and over 10,000 bridges that are begging for our attention.

Last month, I had a hearing focusing on the transportation needs of rural America. Our roads and bridges demonstrate why we need a strong Federal highway program. A network of efficient, interconnected roads is critical to moving people and goods and to the overall health of this economy.

That is why I am committed to working with Chairman Shuster, Chairman Ryan, and others to get a reauthorization bill done.

Federal surface transportation programs are set to expire at the end of this month, and Congress has to act to ensure that these programs continue and that the solvency of the highway trust fund is addressed.

State and local governments need to be able to plan for projects with confidence. They need certainty not just for the next 5 or 6 months, but for the next 5 or 6 years.

This bill enables us to continue our bipartisan efforts on a reauthorization bill, which we hope to accomplish by the end of the year.

We have a tremendous opportunity to secure that bill that is going to improve, rebuild, and modernize our Nation's transportation system, and it is time that we come together to do that.

I want to thank both of the chairmen on their work on H.R. 3038.

[Time: 15:00]

Mr. DeFAZIO. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).

Mr. BLUMENAUER. I appreciate the gentleman's courtesy in yielding me time.

Mr. Speaker, I could not agree with the chairman of the committee more. I personally think that it is time to stop pointing fingers. There is enough bipartisan blame to go around. We didn't quite do the job when the economy was in free fall. We would have, a number of us--I know the ranking member would have--written the Recovery Act differently, but the point is we are here now with the challenge to fund it.

Six States, six Republican States have increased the gas tax already this year. I have got a proposal that is ready to go that could be passed in 2 weeks, and the committee could have the resources to actually fund the bill, but there could be other options. I know the ranking member has a barrel tax, a proposal to index the gas tax and bond against it. I don't care what it is that we do. I do care that we don't continue to stall.

It was exactly a year ago today we were standing here on this moment saying: Don't spill this to the end of the year; we need to get on with it because we will be right back here a year from now. And we are. It is time to act.

Mr. SHUSTER. I continue to reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. DeFAZIO. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Brendan F. Boyle).

Mr. BRENDAN F. BOYLE of Pennsylvania. I want to thank my colleague for yielding me the time.

Mr. Speaker, this is just embarrassing. It is embarrassing that we are here talking about the umpteenth patch for the umpteenth time. Other countries around the world right now are looking at us and wondering whether or not the United States is still interested in leading. Let's forget the short-term patches. Let's finally deal with the problem.

The previous speaker, Mr. Blumenauer, is exactly right. Before coming here, as a State legislator in Pennsylvania, we had Democrats and Republicans band together and cast a very politically tough vote. It was the right thing to do. Both Democrats and Republicans did it, and now we are finally building bridges and repairing roads that we neglected for 20 years in our State.

It is time for the U.S. Federal Government to do exactly the same, right thing. Bite the bullet, and let's show that in America we can solve big problems and we can lead again.

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time to close.

Investing in infrastructure in America has always been extraordinarily bipartisan over the entire time I have been here. Recently, we have kind of gone off the tracks. It means we both have to cooperate on policy and on funding. For the life of me, why has the Republican Party drawn a line in the sand, saying we cannot have user fee-based investment in transportation which benefits people who drive cars, pickup trucks, buses, everybody who moves goods in America, we can't do that anymore, we have got to come up with some fanciful tax reform which may or may not happen? It is very sad.

I proposed doing away with the retail gas tax, imposing a barrel tax, where some of the costs would be paid by ExxonMobil, Wall Street speculators, OPEC, Saudi Arabia, and, yes, they would probably pass a lot of it through at the pump, but that would be a fair way to move forward to make the massive investment we need to put hundreds of thousands of people back to work and get America moving again.

I yield back the balance of my time.

Mr. SHUSTER. Mr. Speaker, my colleague from Oregon makes a good point. We are not spending the kind of dollars--at least, we are not spending wisely the kind of dollars, I would also add to that--to fix our infrastructure problem.

But we do face more difficult times today than we did when we set up the fund in the 1950s or even in the 1980s, as the economy grew. In the 1990s, the economy grew. Today we have an $18 trillion debt. Republicans want to make sure this is fiscally responsible. We want to make sure we are just not layering something else on top of the American people.

More importantly, I hope my colleagues join with me to continue to reduce the regulatory burden that we have put out there to people who build the roads, who operate on the roads, the States that have to come up with a plan to building them.

So again, there is a lot of work to be done. I feel confident that Chairman Ryan and his committee will be able to come up with a funding level that we can continue to work to get a 6-year bill, which I think is essential to this Nation to give the certainty we need to help boost the economy.

A vote against this bill is a vote in favor of shutting down these vital programs, putting transportation projects and jobs across the country at risk, and furloughing Federal employees.

Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to support this bill.

I yield back the balance of my time.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I rise to speak in favor of this. Here is basically what we are trying to do:

We want to get to a long-term highway solution. We believe that, for the sake of jobs, the economy, certainty, planning big projects in our States, we want to do a multiyear highway bill, and typically a multiyear highway bill means a 6-year bill. That is our aspiration and our goal.

We know we are not going to write that bill in the next 2 weeks. We know we need at least 2 or 3 months to write that bill. Unfortunately, the highway trust fund has a fiscal shortfall in 2 weeks, so we are here to extend the highway trust fund through December 18 to give us the time we need to put together a multiyear solution. That costs $8 billion just to do that. What we use are revenue compliance measures to make it easier for people to file their taxes, effectively, and some spending savings to get the $8 billion. Not a single fee increase, not a single tax increase is in this bill to finance the extension of the highway trust fund solvency to December 18.

For example, TSA fees, TSA fees are not being increased. They are staying exactly the same as they are, so nobody getting on an airplane will see anything different. The difference is we keep those fees going to mandatory spending. We keep those fees going to where they are instead of going into discretionary spending where they can be spent in addition to other spending. So by walling off that money so Congress can't go spend it somewhere else, we save money by doing that.

Things like this are what we do. Savings for the taxpayer, tax compliance, easier to comply with your taxes, making sure that fees don't get spent in other areas are some important fiscal savings that we have to make sure that we can extend the solvency of the highway trust fund.

Now, the other point I would simply make is we believe that we have a chance of writing a big multiyear bill. That is why we are seeking this extension. If we didn't think that we had the chance and the opportunity on a bicameral, bipartisan basis to do a 6-year highway funding bill, then we would just do a 2-year bill like the other body is attempting to do. We think we can do a multiyear bill. We think there are ways of doing it, such as incorporating it with international tax reform, things that are important for the economy, things that are important for our businesses. We think that is an opportunity, and that is something that we are exploring on a bipartisan basis.

So for that reason and many others, I urge adoption of this. I think it makes sense. Where I come from in Wisconsin, the way we say it is: We have two seasons--road construction season and winter. The last thing we want to do is see road construction stop at the beginning of August. We need to give our construction, our highways, our people who are filling these construction projects a little certainty, at least get into the winter so they can finish the building season while we work out a long-term highway solution.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. LEVIN. I yield myself such time as I may consume.

As was said, here we go again. A bill from the majority. They have been in power over 4 years, and the result is another patch. We need to do better. We know the state of highways and the infrastructure in this country, our national infrastructure, receives a D-plus grade, getting worse every day. So it has been said we need multiyear, and that is so true.

It is also being said that there needs to be a bipartisan, bicameral bill. I want to just talk to the chairman, to talk to this entire House, to talk to the Congress, having also met with the administration. There is no way to have a multiyear bill, 5, 6 years, unless it is truly bipartisan, involving Democrats as well as Republicans in both Houses.

We have come up with some ideas. We are suggesting today, for example, passage of the Stop Corporate Inversions Act that many others and I introduced some time ago. So we need to consider everything.

I want to close this way: We will not have a multiyear bill if lines are drawn not in sand, but in concrete. If the majority takes the position that some ideas cannot be considered, it is likely to lead infrastructure to another dead end. We need to do much better: multiyear, bipartisan, both Houses, with the administration. If we don't do that, the rest is talk.

This delay has cost millions of jobs. Everybody, including the majority, now talks about middle income and stagnation. Part of it is because we have been stagnant in terms of an infrastructure bill on a long-term basis. That has to stop. We need to put a big red sign that says ``Stop'' in front of the majority in this House and the entire House and the Congress and get busy on a bipartisan basis on a highway long-term bill, all infrastructure.

I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I think the gentleman from Michigan has more speakers than I do, so if it is all right with him, why don't a few of the speakers on his side of the aisle go first.

Mr. LEVIN. We will be glad to do that. We are so full of vigor on this, we have lots of speakers.

I yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from California (Mr. Becerra), a member of our committee, who is also chair of our Caucus.

Mr. BECERRA. I thank the gentleman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, in the greatest, most capacitated nation on Earth, there is no excuse for so many crumbling roads and bridges and for the ever-growing traffic gridlock and congestion that we see every day that we try to get to work. There is no reason why hundreds of thousands of men and women in the construction industry today should remain unemployed because this Congress won't do its job of replenishing the highway trust fund. It is crazy.

We know that when we repair a road or a bridge, we put an American to work, and we make it easier for all of us to get to work so we can be more efficient. But here we are for the 34th time doing a patch to the highway trust fund, which doesn't help any city or county in America because you don't build a road or build a bridge or retrofit a bridge with 2 months of funding or 5 months of funding. You need 6 years to know how much money you can rely on because that contractor doesn't buy cement or lumber for 2 months or 6 months. They buy for 4 or 5 years because, for them, time is money.

We are costing the American people a ton of money by doing these constant patches. Why? Because we are not willing to do what we were elected to do: our job. Instead of just spectating, we should be coming up with the funds to have those roads built and repaired, those bridges built and repaired, to replace those aging buses and trains that stop us from being efficient.

Mr. Speaker, it is time to do it the right way, the long way, a long-term fix, not this short-term patch.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Reichert), the chairman of the Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures. [Time: 15:15]

Mr. REICHERT. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of today's legislation that will ensure that our country's infrastructure needs are met.

The bottom line is we are all here. We have agreement on a lot of the discussion we are having today. We all want a multiyear highway bill. We all recognize that that is what our communities need. That is exactly why we need to pass this bill today, so that we can have that opportunity to discuss these issues over the next few months to come up with a multiyear bill.

It continues funding for construction projects through the end of the year, while giving us the time to come together on a solution that funds a multiyear transportation bill.

This is not just about the economy--it is about the economy, but not just about the economy. It is about jobs and jobs connected with construction and jobs connected with moving our goods across the country and in our communities. It is also about the quality of life that our constituents are having to deal with back home, stuck in traffic for an hour or 2 hours, trying to get home and not having time with their families.

There is a lot involved here with our discussion today and the benefits of a multiyear plan. Of course, when I go back home--just like any other Member--we drive on the highways. We see the need. We experience the congestion.

I want to go back and tell my constituents that we have listened to them, that we realize and recognize that there is a problem; but most of all, I want to go back and say: We have a plan. As Democrats and Republicans, we are going to work together on a multiyear plan that we can agree on to move this country forward, a plan that includes a multiyear highway bill that offers communities greater certainty to plan for the future, improves our roads and bridges, reduces congestion, and eases the movement of goods.

To get there, we must find a way--of course, this is where the rub comes in--to pay for it. By the end of the year, I want to be able to say to my constituents that we have met this challenge and that we have found a solution.

We can start by evaluating whether we can accomplish our goals through a solution that modernizes our international tax system, supports the competitiveness of our American companies, and secures funding for a multiyear transportation bill--and finally defining a permanent funding solution for our infrastructure needs.

Mr. Speaker, I want to ask pardon for a pun I am about to use in my next sentence. The bill today can help drive us there and give us time to have these discussions.

Today, let's pass this bill; send it to the Senate, and let's get to work together, Mr. Speaker. People want us to work together on a multiyear solution to our transportation and infrastructure needs.

Mr. LEVIN. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Neal), an active member of our committee.

Mr. NEAL. Mr. Speaker, in reference to the point that my friend, Sheriff Reichert, just made, I would note the irony of his advocacy on behalf of a plan. I guess, after 35 short-term extensions, we haven't been able to find the time to develop a plan. You need years out to develop a plan.

Just weeks ago, in this very Chamber, our friends on the other side made a full-throttled argument about America remaining competitive in the world, and that is why we needed the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Let me think about this for a moment. We want America to be competitive in the world, and we simultaneously allow America's infrastructure to crumble as we speak. Do you know what is going to get Congress to move, sadly enough? That catastrophe that awaits us somewhere across this country.

The European Union has a highway system that, in many instances, is the envy of the world; the Chinese are developing high-speed rail that is the envy of the world, and we are doing the 35th short-term extension on a highway bill.

Let me relate to our friends on the other side, as you travel across the Federal highway system, there is this great sign everywhere. It says the Dwight D. Eisenhower Federal highway system because a Republican President had the foresight and vision in the aftermath of World War II to develop a first-class Federal highway system.

You know what else he had? He had two great allies in the Congress: Lyndon Johnson, the majority leader in the Senate; and Sam Rayburn, who was the Speaker of this House--who helped sponsor legislation that gave us a system that was the envy of the world.

Mr. Speaker, 35 times we are not going to talk about extending the highway bill because we don't have time to develop a plan.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. LEVIN. I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer), another valued member of our committee.

Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, America is still falling apart and falling behind. We are looking now to slide again past the deadline towards the end of the year. The problem is we are still pretending we can pay for 2015 infrastructure with 1993 dollars. It isn't that hard. It doesn't take 6 months to come up with a funding stream.

I have legislation that is in the committee that could be acted on. We could follow the example of 20 States that have raised their user fees for transportation. We could get courage from the 6 Republican States that have raised their gas tax already this year.

Just a few days ago, in the State of Washington, the Republican-controlled State Senate approved a 15-cent gas tax increase. We could follow the example of Ronald Reagan in 1982, when he urged this Congress to bite the bullet and raise the gas tax. He proposed and Congress followed through on a 125 percent increase in the gas tax.

Somehow, my Republican friends are afraid to use the mechanism that is fast, that is accepted, that the people in the States--Republicans in the States--have the courage to undertake.

Why is it that this year is going to be any different than last year? Why will my speech be any different? Is it going to be cheaper? Is it going to become less complex? Are we going to have a little more backbone?

It is time for us to step up. I would hope that our Ways and Means Committee could take the next 2 weeks, follow regular order, and provide funding so that we could give the Transportation Committee the 2 months they need to fund it, and the job would be done.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. LEVIN. I yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Pascrell), another valued member of our committee.

Mr. PASCRELL. Mr. Speaker, what are we writing here, a new Magna Carta? They have had 4 years, for crying out loud; and we still don't have legislation in front of us.

It has been 2 months since we were last here. We had a lot of talks 2 months ago about how bad extensions are for transportation planning and policy, how the last extension was going to be the last extension. Nothing has changed.

You keep on talking about the anxiety over tax reform and tax change. What about the anxiety that the American people and the contractors and workers have of getting our roads and highways and airports up to snuff? The bill before us today has the Congress paying for our highways and transit systems with more gimmicks.

Tax compliance--these are the same provisions the House rejected last year. Transportation security administrative fees--Nick Calio at the airlines trade association rightfully criticizes: ``This plan proposes to use tomorrow's dollars to pay for today's problems.''

The international tax can be part of a solution to bridge the gap, but corporate America is counting on those revenues to lower their rates and not pay for highway spending. Using an international tax scheme now will make it that much more difficult to get back to a user fee system. The people who use the system should pay for the system. That is what we should be agreeing on.

The Ways and Means Committee did hold two hearings on renewing the trust fund--and we come to this?

This is the new Magna Carta. I am waiting to see the final results 6 months from now. It has been 10 years since this Congress passed a transportation bill. Neither party has the courage to deal with it.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the distinguished gentlewoman from Kansas (Ms. Jenkins), a member of the Ways and Means Committee.

Ms. JENKINS of Kansas. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I thank him for his leadership on this very important issue.

I rise today in support of H.R. 3038. With the prospect of the highway trust fund dollars and spending authority expiring in just over 2 weeks, this bill is a critical step to give our States the certainty that they need to continue work on important infrastructure projects back home. This bill gives the House and the Senate time to work together toward a long-term highway package by the end of the year.

It is also important to note that this bill includes provisions I have pushed for to help many small businesses by establishing a chronological set of due dates for them to pay their taxes. The current law fails to do this, which causes small business and their owners unnecessary grief, time, and money.

I have worked during the past two Congresses on legislation to fix this problem, and I am pleased that the House is acting today to take another burden off the shoulders of small-business people.

I urge support of H.R. 3038.

Mr. LEVIN. I yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Danny K. Davis), another valued member of our committee.

Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, we all know that on July 31, the highway trust fund will expire, but we didn't just learn it. It is not that we just found out last week or last month. We have always known it. Now, we come to where we are backed up against the wall.

We know we need a long-term fix, but I am going to vote for a short-term fix. I am going to vote for it because I want the contractors in my State to keep working. I want the construction workers to keep laying concrete. I want the bridgebuilders to keep repairing bridges.

We can't afford to have a short season. In Illinois, if you don't do construction now, you may not get a chance to do much.

On the basis of the logic of keeping the construction industry moving, I vote ``yes'' for the highway bill that we are considering today.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 1 minute to respond to the gentleman from Chicago.

As a person who represents the State line and drives to O'Hare every week, back and forth, I want to add to the comment. They are in the middle of road construction right now on I-90 going to Chicago. If we don't pass this bill, construction projects like that will stop.

By the way, we need more construction in the Chicagoland area, just like we do around the rest of America. That is why we have to pass this.

I think the gentleman from Illinois hit it right, which is, yes, we knew this was coming; but it takes a while to figure out how to do things like rewrite international tax laws, something we haven't done for decades. It takes a while to figure out how to come up with long-term financing of something like a highway trust fund.

We know that we cannot come up with that answer within the next 2 weeks. We don't want to see these construction projects like the really important one on I-90 and I-94 going to O'Hare--and everywhere else in America--stop in 2 weeks.

That is why this is necessary. We don't like patches anymore than anybody else does, but this patch is necessary to make sure that those projects don't stop.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time. [Time: 15:30]

Mr. LEVIN. I yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Lewis), a truly valued member of our committee and this Congress.

Mr. LEWIS. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my friend for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, I rise to express my strong concern with yet another stopgap measure. Nearly 60 years ago, a Republican President, Dwight Eisenhower, led the charge to create the Interstate Highway System. He realized that good roads were not just about commerce and economic development, they are a national security priority to keep America safe.

I have said it before and I will remind you again: there is no such thing as a Republican road or a Democratic bridge. Today, American roads and bridges, American transit, and American highways are crumbling. This is a national embarrassment.

We have already rolled the ball down the road more than 30 times, and here we are doing it again. The time for talk is past. In the words of Dr. King: We have been bogged down in the paralysis of analysis for too long.

Delay for another day is not an option. American jobs are on the line. In a few short weeks, transportation projects across our country will grind to a stop. We must act, and we must act now.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Mr. LEVIN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.

As I think back, we have been doing this so often, and our chairman said it takes a while. It has been a decade.

I just want to emphasize, if we are no longer going to take a while but do it right, it is going to have to be done on a truly bipartisan basis.

There is a tendency, I think, to go off on a wild goose chase, and that won't build highways. And it won't build if one party doesn't work with another, if the Senate doesn't work with the House. Now we have the Senate seeming to go a different way on a short-term thinking they can do a long-term. Chaos doesn't build highways. So I really hope, however we vote on this bill, that there will be a new dedication to doing what is so long overdue.

All the talk about middle class incomes essentially goes up in smoke when we fail to do what is so clearly in the interest of middle class jobs, and that is to build highways, to repair bridges, to take care of airports, to take care of our infrastructure.

Coming from Michigan, I am ashamed of the state of highways in Michigan compared to when I was a kid and later on. Disrepair has essentially been the hallmark of highway and infrastructure in this country because there has been a failure to step up to the plate.

I just want to finish by saying: Don't put anything aside. Don't say anything can't be considered because that is a ticket, really, to another bridge to nowhere.

I yield back the balance of my time.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. I yield myself the balance of my time.

Mr. Speaker, I will spare the cliches and just simply say I think this is important that we get this done. Both parties have patched this trust fund for, as the gentleman said, 10 years.

Part of the problem we have right now, Mr. Speaker, is the revenue source for highways is a revenue source that is no longer relevant, that doesn't work anymore. Gas taxes don't work well.

Why?

There is a good reason why. We get much better gas mileage. Our engine technology is better. Some cars don't even use gas. They are electric, and therefore, as a result, we don't pay as much for the highways we use, and that is the problem.

So we are trying to figure out what is a way we can bridge finance the highway trust fund so that we can come up with a new revenue source for the long term. That means we have to have a medium term, a 6-year highway bill to make sure that the construction that we need to get done gets done, and that is going to take us some time to figure this out.

That is why we need to have this patch to give us that time, because if we fail to pass this extension right now, then I can, sure as day, tell you what will come over from the other body will be a medium, about an 18-month extension, and that will come through here, and we will not get the bridge we need. We will not get the ability to give multiyear projects the ability to plan and get off the ground, and we will not have done our jobs.

So in order to give us a chance to do our jobs, to get the long-term solution in place, to work on these big issues, we need to get ourselves a few more months' time. That is why I think, on a bipartisan basis, Members understand and appreciate this situation and therefore will, hopefully, support this.

Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

[Begin Insert]

Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I will vote for H.R. 3038, the Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, because our nation cannot afford a surface transportation shutdown. There are still upwards of 15 million Americans either unemployed or underemployed, and a lapse in highway funding--however brief--would jeopardize thousands of Americans' livelihoods. My hope is that Republicans will stop careening toward crisis and finally pass a long-term measure to fix our aging infrastructure and put Americans to work. I am proud to support such a solution: today's Democratic Motion to Recommit aimed to allow a vote to re-authorize a long-term Transportation Bill to provide 6 years of funding for states and localities to repair crumbling roads and bridges. The time has come to stop governing by crisis and start making long-term investments to build a full employment society.

Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Mr. Speaker, roads, bridges, and railroads are crumbling all across America. In North Carolina, which used to be known as the ``good roads'' state, over 5,500 bridges are structurally unsound, and poor roads cost drivers $1.5 billion a year. That's why I am so frustrated that instead of seizing the opportunity to build a viable transportation system with a long-term highway-transit bill, Republican leaders have instead elected to once again kick the can down the proverbial road and forgo critical repairs and safety improvements, to say nothing of new construction.

Despite these grave reservations, I will vote for today's 5-month extension because I believe it will allow congressional leaders to negotiate the comprehensive transportation overhaul we so desperately need. However, like President Obama, I will not support future efforts to shirk the responsibility of rebuilding our nation's infrastructure.

Short-term, stop-gap, extension-to-extension governance has become the norm over the past few years, and I'm frankly fed up with it. House Democrats are ready to get serious about making the investments we need to make to thrive as a country--I strongly encourage Republicans to answer the call.

Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Mr. Speaker, today, I rise in support of a long-term surface transportation bill.

It's disappointing that Congress once again has failed to propose a long-term solution to invest in our nation's roads, bridges, and rails.

The bill being brought to the floor is nothing more than a Band Aid: however, without this temporary fix, the Department of Transportation would be unable to fund new obligations to repair America's crumbling roads and fix our Nation's vast infrastructure problems. The reality is our nation's investment in infrastructure is woefully inadequate. These shortfalls hurt our constituents and damage our entire economy.

In Alabama, twenty percent of our major city streets are in poor condition. Driving on deteriorating roads costs motorists approximately $1.4 billion a year.

Across our country, an estimated one in three fatal traffic accidents is caused by roads that are in poor or mediocre condition. Moreover, The American Society of Civil Engineers estimates that one out of every nine bridges in the U.S. is structurally deficient.

By building the infrastructure of tomorrow, we would create thousands of good-paying construction jobs that help more hard-working Americans earn a living.

Investing in our infrastructure would also enhance our economic competitiveness by reducing transit costs and travel delays.

We can't continue to kick the can down the road--we must do better by our constituents. There's no reason why Congress cannot pass a long-term plan that would fix our aging infrastructure and boost our nation's economic development.

Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 3064, the GROW AMERICA Act, a bill that underscores the urgent need for a long-term investment in our Country's transportation infrastructure.

With only eighteen days left before the Highway Trust Fund expires on July 31st, we should be urgently seeking out a long term solution.

Instead, we are considering H.R. 3038, another short term extension of the Highway Trust Fund that only provides five months of additional funding. This five month quick-fix fails to provide America with the stability of a more permanent solution. Passing this bill only continues the repeated pattern of kicking the can down the road, further putting off the sensible solution that we owe to our constituents.

In my home state of Texas, 38 percent of roads are in mediocre or poor condition, forcing drivers to spend approximately $5.3 billion annually on otherwise unnecessary automotive repairs. With 19% of our state's bridges being structurally deficient, it is clear that a sweeping bipartisan effort is needed to invest in the future of America's infrastructure.

Without a long term extension, many states are unable to plan future construction projects, providing much needed repair to deteriorating roads. This is particularly crippling for Texas, which has a longer construction season because of its climate.

In the Dallas area specifically, we currently have nine major construction projects costing in excess of $275 million that would be put on hold, in the event that the highway trust fund runs out of money. This is simply unfair. It is harmful to the growth that this region is experiencing, and places an unnecessary burden on Dallas residents and their ability to commute safely.

Just a few months ago, I spoke out against the House's refusal to take up long term action on the Highway Trust Fund; and yet, we are again attempting to put a band-aid on a deep cut to America's transportation needs

By contrast, H.R. 3064, the GROW AMERICA Act seeks to address the harmful impacts of continuous stop-gap funding. This bill infuses our economy with transportation infrastructure investment, providing $478 billion over six years for highways, bridges, public transportation, highway safety, and rail programs.

Enacting a six-year GROW AMERICA Act adds nearly two million jobs, compared to another extension of surface transportation programs, and is desperately needed to improve transportation quality across the nation.

I urge my colleagues to call their transportation departments, if they have not already, and find out how short funding patches in Federal highway funds would affect their states. Bridge replacements, traffic decongestion projects, and road widening efforts, all impact safety, time, money and jobs; all of which stand to be harmed by short-term funding.

Mr. Speaker, with only eighteen days until the Highway Trust Fund runs out of money, I urge my colleagues to support the GROW AMERICA Act, a multi-year solution that provides states with the funding necessary to adequately invest in their infrastructure.

Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I support workers and the important transportation and infrastructure jobs they do. They deserve the certainty and support that a long-term, well-funded highway funding bill would provide. H.R. 3038 is not that bill.

Our infrastructure is rated a D+ by the American Society of Civil Engineers. A transportation system that was once the envy of the world has fallen into disrepair. We've passed dozens of short-term extensions over the past decade, and they haven't done the trick.

We know where this bill will leave us: infrastructure projects won't be planned beyond December, long-overdue projects will hang in limbo, and workers will be left wondering if they'll spend the holidays unemployed.

Every business owner, worker, and state and local official I have spoken with has asked for the same thing: a long-term, well-funded bill. In order to do that, we need to make a commitment to filling the funding gap from the gas tax--which has not been increased in more than two decades.

I support gradually raising the gas tax to pay for our infrastructure priorities. I also joined 184 of my Democratic colleagues in supporting a motion that would have paid for a long-term, well-funded highway bill by preventing corporate tax inversions--the process of moving corporate headquarters overseas. Just one Republican supported that proposal. Doing either of those things would sustain the vital infrastructure investments we need.

Those who suggest we can't afford a good highway bill are wrong. We are the richest country in the world at the richest time in our history. Funding our roads and bridges is a priority. We can afford it, and the American people demand that we do.

What we cannot do is continue the path of unpredictability and short-term planning that results from these stopgap measures for our highways, bridges, and other infrastructure projects. That is why I voted against H.R. 3038.

This is the greatest country in the world, and there is nothing we cannot do. It's time to act accordingly by advancing a long-term, well-funded transportation bill.

[End Insert]

The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate has expired.

Pursuant to House Resolution 362, the previous question is ordered on the bill.

The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill.

The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was read the third time.

MOTION TO RECOMMIT

Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?

Mr. VAN HOLLEN. I am opposed, Mr. Speaker.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to recommit.

The Clerk read as follows:

Mr. Van Hollen moves to recommit the bill H.R. 3038 to the Committee on Ways and Means with instructions to report the same back to the House forthwith with the following amendment:

At the end of the bill, add the following:

TITLE IV--STOP CORPORATE EXPATRIATION AND INVEST IN AMERICA'S INFRASTRUCTURE ACT
SEC. 4001. SHORT TITLE.
 This title may be cited as the ``Stop Corporate Expatriation and Invest in America's Infrastructure Act of 2015''.
SEC. 4002. MODIFICATIONS TO RULES RELATING TO INVERTED CORPORATIONS.
 (a) In General.--Subsection (b) of section 7874 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended to read as follows:
 ``(b) Inverted Corporations Treated as Domestic Corporations.--
 ``(1) IN GENERAL.--Notwithstanding section 7701(a)(4), a foreign corporation shall be treated for purposes of this title as a domestic corporation if--
 ``(A) such corporation would be a surrogate foreign corporation if subsection (a)(2) were applied by substituting `80 percent' for `60 percent', or
 ``(B) such corporation is an inverted domestic corporation.
 ``(2) INVERTED DOMESTIC CORPORATION.--For purposes of this subsection, a foreign corporation shall be treated as an inverted domestic corporation if, pursuant to a plan (or a series of related transactions)--
 ``(A) the entity completes after May 8, 2014, the direct or indirect acquisition of--
 ``(i) substantially all of the properties held directly or indirectly by a domestic corporation, or
 ``(ii) substantially all of the assets of, or substantially all of the properties constituting a trade or business of, a domestic partnership, and
 ``(B) after the acquisition, either--
 ``(i) more than 50 percent of the stock (by vote or value) of the entity is held--
 ``(I) in the case of an acquisition with respect to a domestic corporation, by former shareholders of the domestic corporation by reason of holding stock in the domestic corporation, or
 ``(II) in the case of an acquisition with respect to a domestic partnership, by former partners of the domestic partnership by reason of holding a capital or profits interest in the domestic partnership, or
 ``(ii) the management and control of the expanded affiliated group which includes the entity occurs, directly or indirectly, primarily within the United States, and such expanded affiliated group has significant domestic business activities.
 ``(3) EXCEPTION FOR CORPORATIONS WITH SUBSTANTIAL BUSINESS ACTIVITIES IN FOREIGN COUNTRY OF ORGANIZATION.--A foreign corporation described in paragraph (2) shall not be treated as an inverted domestic corporation if after the acquisition the expanded affiliated group which includes the entity has substantial business activities in the foreign country in which or under the law of which the entity is created or organized when compared to the total business activities of such expanded affiliated group. For purposes of subsection (a)(2)(B)(iii) and the preceding sentence, the term `substantial business activities' shall have the meaning given such term under regulations in effect on May 8, 2014, except that the Secretary may issue regulations increasing the threshold percent in any of the tests under such regulations for determining if business activities constitute substantial business activities for purposes of this paragraph.
 ``(4) MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL.--For purposes of paragraph (2)(B)(ii)--
 ``(A) IN GENERAL.--The Secretary shall prescribe regulations for purposes of determining cases in which the management and control of an expanded affiliated group is to be treated as occurring, directly or indirectly, primarily within the United States. The regulations prescribed under the preceding sentence shall apply to periods after May 8, 2014.
 ``(B) EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT.--Such regulations shall provide that the management and control of an expanded affiliated group shall be treated as occurring, directly or indirectly, primarily within the United States if substantially all of the executive officers and senior management of the expanded affiliated group who exercise day-to-day responsibility for making decisions involving strategic, financial, and operational policies of the expanded affiliated group are based or primarily located within the United States. Individuals who in fact exercise such day-to-day responsibilities shall be treated as executive officers and senior management regardless of their title.
 ``(5) SIGNIFICANT DOMESTIC BUSINESS ACTIVITIES.--For purposes of paragraph (2)(B)(ii), an expanded affiliated group has significant domestic business activities if at least 25 percent of--
 ``(A) the employees of the group are based in the United States,
 ``(B) the employee compensation incurred by the group is incurred with respect to employees based in the United States,
 ``(C) the assets of the group are located in the United States, or
 ``(D) the income of the group is derived in the United States,
determined in the same manner as such determinations are made for purposes of determining substantial business activities under regulations referred to in paragraph (3) as in effect on May 8, 2014, but applied by treating all references in such regulations to `foreign country' and `relevant foreign country' as references to `the United States'. The Secretary may issue regulations decreasing the threshold percent in any of the tests under such regulations for determining if business activities constitute significant domestic business activities for purposes of this paragraph.''.
 (b) Conforming Amendments.--
 (1) Clause (i) of section 7874(a)(2)(B) of such Code is amended by striking ``after March 4, 2003,'' and inserting ``after March 4, 2003, and before May 9, 2014,''.
 (2) Subsection (c) of section 7874 of such Code is amended--
 (A) in paragraph (2)--
 (i) by striking ``subsection (a)(2)(B)(ii)'' and inserting ``subsections (a)(2)(B)(ii) and (b)(2)(B)(i)'', and
 (ii) by inserting ``or (b)(2)(A)'' after ``(a)(2)(B)(i)'' in subparagraph (B),
 (B) in paragraph (3), by inserting ``or (b)(2)(B)(i), as the case may be,'' after ``(a)(2)(B)(ii)'',
 (C) in paragraph (5), by striking ``subsection (a)(2)(B)(ii)'' and inserting ``subsections (a)(2)(B)(ii) and (b)(2)(B)(i)'', and
 (D) in paragraph (6), by inserting ``or inverted domestic corporation, as the case may be,'' after ``surrogate foreign corporation''.
 (c) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section shall apply to taxable years ending after May 8, 2014.


Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the reading be dispensed with.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Wisconsin?

There was no objection.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I reserve a point of order.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. A point of order is reserved.

Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from Maryland is recognized for 5 minutes in support of his motion.

Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. Speaker, we have a very sad state of affairs here. We know we have an urgent problem with respect to infrastructure around America. Our roads, our bridges, our transitways are in disrepair at a time when we should actually be investing more to modernize our American infrastructure so we can compete and put people back to work.

And yet what do we have from our Republican colleagues? More of the same. Five more months of inadequate funding, no certainty for people who need to plan for projects. People are going to face layoffs again. So we have an urgent problem, and the response we get from our Republican colleagues is 5 months of inadequate funding.

We have put forward a 6-year plan, the first 2 years fully funded of a more robust plan. How do we fund it? We fund it by saying ``no more'' to the companies, the American companies that are cheating the American taxpayers by inversion.

So what are they doing? They are simply changing their addresses to an overseas address so they don't have to pay any more into helping our infrastructure and helping our country.

Let me give you an example of what these companies are doing. They are not moving their employees. They are not moving their management. They are not moving their factories or anything else. They are just changing their mailing address by acquiring a small foreign company and, in doing so, saying: We are not going to pay any more of our taxes.

So to the chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, I think most Americans would disagree with you that we need more time. We don't need 5 more months to figure out that these corporations are cheating, as taxpayers, by using these special provisions. We can close this tax loophole right now. In fact, about 30 of these companies have inverted in the last 5 years.

So we want to wait another 5 months and allow 5, 10 more to use this tax device to escape their responsibilities to the American taxpayer? Why should we do that?

Let's do the right thing, and let's do it right now. We have that within our power. That is what the legislation that we have put forward is all about. Let's invest in our national infrastructure, and let's use it by getting the savings from these companies that are engaging in these inversion tax practices.

I am pleased to yield the remainder of my time to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Israel).

Mr. ISRAEL. I thank my colleague.

Mr. Speaker, Republicans and Democrats until this Congress have always agreed that the way you build an economy is by building highways, bridges, tunnels, and transit.

With this Congress, Mr. Speaker, under this Republican Congress, we are not building; we are patching. As a result, the American people are sitting in more traffic, longer rush hours, with higher repair bills.

Well, this is a choice, Mr. Speaker. Under the Republican plan, we can kick the can down the crumbling highway. We can patch through December, telling construction workers we don't know if they are going to work after that. We can fund the status quo.

Or, under this plan, we can be big, bold, and fair. We have 6 years of work, a 6-year extension of the highway trust fund, $40 billion in jobs and construction. It is funded not by asking Americans to dig deeper into their pockets or take something from their paychecks. It is funded by telling America's corporations they cannot establish an address for themselves in the Caribbean in order to avoid paying their fair share of taxes right here at home.

Mr. Speaker, the American people are fed up. They are sitting in traffic. They can feel their tires hitting the potholes. They are told we can't afford to fix those potholes because we don't have the money. They sit in longer rush hours. Meanwhile, corporations rush to the Caribbean to avoid paying their fair share of taxes to fix the potholes.

This is the choice: Will we protect tax gimmicks for America's biggest corporations, or will we protect the American taxpayer and America's workers?

Our proposal, Mr. Speaker, grows jobs, creates sustainable growth and paychecks. It fixes potholes. It fixes our highways and transit. It gets Americans to their jobs on time. It rebuilds our economy by rebuilding jobs. And it is a choice we are making today. The choice is this, Mr. Speaker: Will we protect tax gimmicks for tax dodgers, or will we protect jobs for the American people?

Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw the reservation of the point of order.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The reservation of the point of order is withdrawn.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. Mr. Speaker, I claim the time in opposition.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.

Mr. RYAN of Wisconsin. I have a few points.

Number one, I am looking through the bill, the motion to recommit here. There is no 6-year plan in here. There is no 6-year highway project plan in here. They may have proposed one, but it is not being offered here today. All this bill does is the stop corporate expatriation and invest in America's infrastructure, but there is no invest in America's infrastructure here, just the tax increase.

Let's speak to that.

We have heard speaker after speaker after speaker here from the other side of the aisle say: You are getting away from gas taxes to fund highways, to fund infrastructure.

What does this do? This isn't a gas tax increase. So you are moving away from the user fee principle yourself in your own rhetoric.

Let's speak to the substance of this particular proposal. This proposal will do a couple of things.

Number one, it will encourage foreign companies to buy U.S. companies. You might as well say this is the Buy American Company Act of 2015.

Number two, it will encourage U.S. corporate headquarters to move overseas. Don't take my word for it. That is the characterization of this bill by the Senate Democratic Policy chair, the senior Senator from New York, who has said this policy will encourage U.S. headquarters to be moved overseas.

[Time: 15:45]

Inversions are bad. We want to stop inversions. But to quote the Treasury Secretary of the other side's party, the way to stop inversions is tax reform.

Why are we here doing this patch? So that we can give ourselves the time to do tax reform, to do international tax reform, so that we can prevent inversions. That is the whole purpose of this episode that we are having here.

So not only is this really bad policy, it doesn't work. It won't affect what they are trying to do.

If you want to stop inversions, you have got to do tax reforms. Adding more obstacles to U.S. companies doesn't stop U.S. companies from moving. It simply says that they are more ripe for takeovers by foreign companies.

There is a very dangerous trend, Mr. Speaker, of foreign companies buying U.S. companies. It is happening at an alarming pace. If this were to pass, it would accelerate that pace.

And the way that this is written, it would say: If you have your headquarters in America, as an American company, you had better move them overseas. Why would we want to do that?

The real solution is tax reform, make America more competitive and make America the place you want to have your corporate headquarters.

Let's have American companies buy foreign companies instead of the other way around. That is what we should be doing.

Let's just have a little truth in advertising here. This doesn't stop inversions. This accelerates American companies being bought by foreign companies. It accelerates American headquarters going overseas, and it doesn't fund anything for the next 6 years.

So with that and many other reasons, I urge a ``no'' vote on this motion to recommit.

I yield back the balance of my time.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit.

There was no objection.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.

The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that the noes appeared to have it.

Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered.

The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule XX, this 15-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 5-minute votes on passage, if ordered; the motion to suspend the rules on H.R. 2722; and approval of the Journal, if ordered.

The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 185, nays 244, not voting 4, as follows:

[Roll No. 440]

YEAS--185

Adams
Aguilar
Ashford
Bass
Beatty
Becerra
Bera
Bishop (GA)
Blumenauer
Bonamici
Boyle, Brendan F.
Brady (PA)
Brown (FL)
Brownley (CA)
Bustos
Butterfield
Capps
Capuano
Cárdenas
Carney
Carson (IN)
Cartwright
Castor (FL)
Castro (TX)
Chu, Judy
Cicilline
Clark (MA)
Clarke (NY)
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Cohen
Connolly
Conyers
Cooper
Costa
Courtney
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Davis (CA)
Davis, Danny
DeFazio
DeGette
Delaney
DeLauro
DelBene
DeSaulnier
Deutch
Dingell
Doggett
Doyle, Michael F.
Duckworth
Edwards
Ellison
Eshoo
Esty
Farr
Fattah
Foster
Frankel (FL)
Fudge
Gabbard
Gallego
Garamendi
Graham
Grayson
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutiérrez
Hahn
Hastings
Heck (WA)
Higgins
Himes
Hinojosa
Honda
Hoyer
Huffman
Israel
Jackson Lee
Jeffries
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Jones
Kaptur
Keating
Kelly (IL)
Kennedy
Kildee
Kilmer
Kind
Kirkpatrick
Kuster
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lawrence
Lee
Levin
Lewis
Lieu, Ted
Lipinski
Loebsack
Lofgren
Lowenthal
Lowey
Lujan Grisham (NM)
Luján, Ben Ray (NM)
Lynch
Maloney, Carolyn
Maloney, Sean
Matsui
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern
McNerney
Meeks
Meng
Moore
Moulton
Murphy (FL)
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Nolan
Norcross
O'Rourke
Pallone
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Peters
Peterson
Pingree
Pocan
Polis
Price (NC)
Quigley
Rangel
Rice (NY)
Richmond
Roybal-Allard
Ruiz
Ruppersberger
Rush
Ryan (OH)
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Scott (VA)
Scott, David
Serrano
Sewell (AL)
Sherman
Sinema
Sires
Slaughter
Smith (WA)
Speier
Swalwell (CA)
Takai
Takano
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Titus
Tonko
Torres
Tsongas
Van Hollen
Vargas
Veasey
Vela
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walz
Wasserman Schultz
Waters, Maxine
Watson Coleman
Welch
Wilson (FL)
Yarmuth

NAYS--244

Abraham
Aderholt
Allen
Amash
Amodei
Babin
Barletta
Barr
Barton
Benishek
Bilirakis
Bishop (MI)
Black
Blackburn
Blum
Bost
Boustany
Brady (TX)
Brat
Bridenstine
Brooks (AL)
Brooks (IN)
Buchanan
Buck
Bucshon
Burgess
Byrne
Calvert
Carter (GA)
Carter (TX)
Chabot
Chaffetz
Clawson (FL)
Coffman
Cole
Collins (GA)
Collins (NY)
Comstock
Conaway
Cook
Costello (PA)
Cramer
Crawford
Crenshaw
Culberson
Curbelo (FL)
Davis, Rodney
Denham
Dent
DeSantis
DesJarlais
Diaz-Balart
Dold
Donovan
Duffy
Duncan (SC)
Duncan (TN)
Ellmers (NC)
Emmer (MN)
Farenthold
Fincher
Fitzpatrick
Fleischmann
Fleming
Flores
Forbes
Fortenberry
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Frelinghuysen
Garrett
Gibbs
Gibson
Gohmert
Goodlatte
Gosar
Gowdy
Granger
Graves (GA)
Graves (LA)
Graves (MO)
Griffith
Grothman
Guinta
Guthrie
Hanna
Hardy
Harper
Harris
Hartzler
Heck (NV)
Hensarling
Herrera Beutler
Hice, Jody B.
Hill
Holding
Hudson
Huelskamp
Huizenga (MI)
Hultgren
Hunter
Hurd (TX)
Hurt (VA)
Issa
Jenkins (KS)
Jenkins (WV)
Johnson (OH)
Johnson, Sam
Jolly
Jordan
Joyce
Katko
Kelly (MS)
Kelly (PA)
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kinzinger (IL)
Kline
Knight
Labrador
LaMalfa
Lamborn
Lance
Latta
LoBiondo
Long
Loudermilk
Love
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lummis
MacArthur
Marchant
Marino
Massie
McCarthy
McCaul
McClintock
McHenry
McKinley
McMorris Rodgers
McSally
Meadows
Meehan
Messer
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Moolenaar
Mooney (WV)
Mullin
Mulvaney
Murphy (PA)
Neugebauer
Newhouse
Noem
Nugent
Nunes
Olson
Palazzo
Palmer
Pascrell
Paulsen
Pearce
Perry
Pittenger
Pitts
Poe (TX)
Poliquin
Pompeo
Posey
Price, Tom
Ratcliffe
Reed
Reichert
Renacci
Ribble
Rice (SC)
Rigell
Roby
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rohrabacher
Rokita
Rooney (FL)
Ros-Lehtinen
Roskam
Ross
Rothfus
Rouzer
Royce
Russell
Ryan (WI)

[Page: H5213]  GPO's PDF
Salmon
Sanford
Scalise
Schweikert
Scott, Austin
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Smith (MO)
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Stefanik
Stewart
Stivers
Stutzman
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiberi
Tipton
Trott
Turner
Upton
Valadao
Wagner
Walberg
Walden
Walker
Walorski
Walters, Mimi
Weber (TX)
Webster (FL)
Wenstrup
Westerman
Westmoreland
Whitfield
Williams
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Womack
Woodall
Yoder
Yoho
Young (AK)
Young (IA)
Young (IN)
Zeldin
Zinke
NOT VOTING--4
Beyer
Bishop (UT)
Engel
Schrader


[Time: 16:13]
Messrs. WENSTRUP, DUNCAN of Tennessee, BROOKS of Alabama, MacARTHUR, HULTGREN, PITTENGER, and HARDY changed their vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
Ms. CASTOR of Florida, Messrs. PETERS and LARSON of Connecticut changed their vote from ``nay'' to ``yea.''
So the motion to recommit was rejected.
The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that the ayes appeared to have it.
RECORDED VOTE
Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
A recorded vote was ordered.
The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 312, noes 119, not voting 2, as follows:
[Roll No. 441]
AYES--312
Abraham
Adams
Aderholt
Allen
Ashford
Babin
Barr
Barton
Bass
Beatty
Benishek
Bera
Bilirakis
Bishop (GA)
Bishop (MI)
Bishop (UT)
Black
Bonamici
Bost
Boustany
Boyle, Brendan F.
Brady (PA)
Brady (TX)
Brooks (IN)
Brownley (CA)
Buchanan
Bucshon
Burgess
Bustos
Butterfield
Calvert
Capps
Capuano
Carson (IN)
Carter (GA)
Carter (TX)
Castro (TX)
Chabot
Chaffetz
Chu, Judy
Cicilline
Clarke (NY)
Clyburn
Coffman
Cohen
Cole
Collins (NY)
Comstock
Conaway
Connolly
Conyers
Cook
Costa
Costello (PA)
Cramer
Crawford
Crenshaw
Crowley
Cuellar
Culberson
Curbelo (FL)
Davis (CA)
Davis, Danny
Davis, Rodney
DeFazio
Delaney
DelBene
Denham
Dent
Deutch
Diaz-Balart
Dingell
Dold
Donovan
Duckworth
Duncan (TN)
Ellison
Ellmers (NC)
Emmer (MN)
Eshoo
Esty
Farr
Fattah
Fincher
Fitzpatrick
Fleischmann
Forbes
Fortenberry
Foster
Foxx
Frankel (FL)
Frelinghuysen
Gabbard
Gallego
Garamendi
Gibbs
Gibson
Goodlatte
Gowdy
Graham
Granger
Graves (LA)
Graves (MO)
Grayson
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Guinta
Guthrie
Hahn
Hanna
Hardy
Harper
Harris
Hastings
Heck (WA)
Hensarling
Herrera Beutler
Higgins
Hill
Himes
Hinojosa
Holding
Honda
Hoyer
Hudson
Huffman
Huizenga (MI)
Hultgren
Hunter
Hurd (TX)
Hurt (VA)
Israel
Issa
Jackson Lee
Jeffries
Jenkins (KS)
Jenkins (WV)
Johnson (GA)
Johnson (OH)
Johnson, E. B.
Johnson, Sam
Joyce
Katko
Keating
Kelly (MS)
Kelly (PA)
Kilmer
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kinzinger (IL)
Kirkpatrick
Kline
Knight
Kuster
LaMalfa
Lance
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Lawrence
Lee
Levin
Lewis
Lieu, Ted
Lipinski
LoBiondo
Loebsack
Lofgren
Long
Love
Lowenthal
Lowey
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
Lujan Grisham (NM)
Luján, Ben Ray (NM)
Lynch
MacArthur
Maloney, Carolyn
Marchant
Marino
McCarthy
McCaul
McHenry
McKinley
McMorris Rodgers
McNerney
McSally
Meadows
Meehan
Meeks
Meng
Messer
Mica
Miller (FL)
Miller (MI)
Moolenaar
Mooney (WV)
Mullin
Murphy (FL)
Murphy (PA)
Nadler
Napolitano
Newhouse
Noem
Nolan
Norcross
Nugent
Nunes
O'Rourke
Olson
Pallone
Paulsen
Payne
Pelosi
Peterson
Pingree
Pittenger
Pitts
Pocan
Poe (TX)
Poliquin
Price (NC)
Price, Tom
Quigley
Reed
Reichert
Richmond
Roby
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rohrabacher
Rokita
Rooney (FL)
Ros-Lehtinen
Roskam
Ross
Rouzer
Roybal-Allard
Royce
Ruiz
Ruppersberger
Rush
Russell
Ryan (OH)
Ryan (WI)
Sanchez, Loretta
Sarbanes
Scalise
Schiff
Scott, David
Serrano
Sessions
Sewell (AL)
Sherman
Shimkus
Shuster
Simpson
Sinema
Sires
Slaughter
Smith (MO)
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Smith (WA)
Stefanik
Stewart
Stivers
Stutzman
Swalwell (CA)
Takai
Takano
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiberi
Titus
Torres
Trott
Turner
Upton
Valadao
Vargas
Veasey
Vela
Velázquez
Wagner
Walberg
Walden
Walorski
Walters, Mimi
Walz
Wasserman Schultz
Waters, Maxine
Watson Coleman
Webster (FL)
Wenstrup
Westerman
Whitfield
Williams
Wilson (FL)
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Womack
Woodall
Yarmuth
Young (AK)
Young (IA)
Young (IN)
Zeldin
Zinke

NOES--119

Aguilar
Amash
Amodei
Barletta
Becerra
Blackburn
Blum
Blumenauer
Brat
Bridenstine
Brooks (AL)
Brown (FL)
Buck
Byrne
Cárdenas
Carney
Cartwright
Castor (FL)
Clark (MA)
Clawson (FL)
Clay
Cleaver
Collins (GA)
Cooper
Courtney
Cummings
DeGette
DeLauro
DeSantis
DeSaulnier
DesJarlais
Doggett
Doyle, Michael F.
Duffy
Duncan (SC)
Edwards
Farenthold
Fleming
Flores
Franks (AZ)
Fudge
Garrett
Gohmert
Gosar
Graves (GA)
Griffith
Grijalva
Grothman
Gutiérrez
Hartzler
Heck (NV)
Hice, Jody B.
Huelskamp
Jolly
Jones
Jordan
Kaptur
Kelly (IL)
Kennedy
Kildee
Kind
Labrador
Lamborn
Larson (CT)
Latta
Loudermilk
Lummis
Maloney, Sean
Massie
Matsui
McClintock
McCollum
McDermott
McGovern
Moore
Moulton
Mulvaney
Neal
Neugebauer
Palazzo
Palmer
Pascrell
Pearce
Perlmutter
Perry
Peters
Polis
Pompeo
Posey
Rangel
Ratcliffe
Renacci
Ribble
Rice (NY)
Rice (SC)
Rigell
Rothfus
Salmon
Sánchez, Linda T.
Sanford
Schakowsky
Schrader
Schweikert
Scott (VA)
Scott, Austin
Sensenbrenner
Speier
Thompson (MS)
Tipton
Tonko
Tsongas
Van Hollen
Visclosky
Walker
Weber (TX)
Welch
Westmoreland
Yoder
Yoho

NOT VOTING--2

Beyer
Engel


ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE

The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes remaining.

[Time: 16:20]

Ms. BROWN of Florida and Mr. GOHMERT changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''

So the bill was passed.

The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.



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