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THE ARGUS AND THE RULES OF THE ROAD.

American Government Special Collections Reference Desk

THE ARGUS AND THE RULES OF THE ROAD.

Rock Island Argus
August 29, 1913 (Home Edition)


Under the spell of surpassing egotism and smart belittleings which had fallen so suddenly upon him yesterday morning as to prompt his mission to police headquarters as a public regulator, F. A. Andrews sought to impart the idea that The Argus regards automobile owners in the sense of envy. This is the reason Mr. Andrews labored to convey to Chief Brinn, the paper has been so active in demanding proper respect for enfocement of the ordinances governing the use of the streets. Without taking too seriously at heart Mr. Andrews' opinion of it, The Argus has but to say it has no more prejudice against an automobile owner on the street than it has against the man who pushes a wheelbarrow, or a pedestrian. Each has equal rights, which are entitled to respect under the rules of the road. The Argus, in its stand for proper traffic regulations, is concerned in the welfare of just one class, and that is known as the average citizen, regardless of whether he travels in an automobile, on a motorcycle, a bicycle, in a horse-drawn vehicle, or horse or afoot, and who, law-abiding himself, is possessed of proper regard for the rights of others. It is of this sort of men that The Argus is the unbiased champion.

In this further reference to Mr. Andrews' unwarranted allusion to this paper, a few words may be added relative to the unfortunate circumstances in which Mr. Andrews was involved some months ago, when his machine ran down and killed a 12-year old boy in the streets of Rock Island. Lest the idea prevail that The Argus undertook to shield Mr. Andrews at that time, it is perhaps proper to explain that Mr. Andrews then, as now was looked upon as a reckless driver, and knowing these facts and the feeling that might arise in consequence of the accident, The Argus was prompt to make a thorough investigation of all the facts in order to set him right before the people if it developed that he was not to blame. The Argus was very glad to ascertain that it was not his fault that the tragedy occurred, and these circumstances, which were borne out by the evidence before the coroner's jury later, were put before the public in connection with the account of the accident.

Doubtless this act of fairness on The Argus' part saved Mr. Andrews more or less trouble at that time. He paid The Argus for its pains yesterday.

It is hoped, however, that Mr. Andrews will not get the idea into his head that it is on this account, that in common with other automobile owners he will be compelled to obey the law.

For The Argus' course is fixed, and despite the fact that good results are already attending its efforts, they may be no more than just begun.



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